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Full text of "The Tower, 1934"

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harm k 



arm kener 



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editor 



doris bradleij 

associate editor 

cnarles rouue 

business manaqer 

karl lonr 

advertisinq manaqer 



the 

ouuer 

1934 



published annuallu 

Du cne 



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tout inscicut 



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menomonie 
uuiscon sin 






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Contents 



COLLEGE 

COLLEGE LIFE 

ATHLETICS 

FEATURES 



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Dedication 



To Gertrude L Callahan, the adviser 
who has kept us ever striving to 
produce a yearbook which would 
surpass all its predecessors, the 
1934 Tower Staff dedicates this 
Tower with the hope that there 
may be within its pases a part of 
the vision and understands and 
loveliness which we have seen in her. 



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Tall, rugged, sturdy, brave, 

Born of warm hearts and visions, 

The Tower watches down the worn old street, 

Marking the rhythm of hurrying feet. 

— Carmen Spreiter 



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THE TOWER 1934 



The gilded sunshine falls through trees 
To lie like water on the moss beside me. Silently 
The shadows turn and gather leaves made green 
Translucent glass by the slow alchemy of sunlight 

—Louise Monahan 



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THE TOWER 1934 



Mother of homes, she gazes proudly on her children, 
And smiles to see the soft smol(c drifting upward 
From hearthfires she has fyndkd. 

—Carmen Spreiter 



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THE TOWER 1934 



The wind moans faintly and the stars are few. 
The snowfiak.es flow and flow, li\e threads of steel 
Over the hedges. Cold, the little sound 
Of steel on steel, snow breaking against snow. 

— Louise Monahan 



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THE TOWER 1934 



\ew times demand new measures and new men; 
The world advances, and in time outgrows 
The laws that in our fathers' day were best; 
And, doubtless, after us, some purer scheme 
Will be shaped out by wiser men tfwn we. 

— James Russell Lowell 



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THE TOWER 1934 




Burton E. Nelson, President 



Wisdom is not only to be acquired, but to be utilized."— Cicero. 



The purpose of education is not alone to learn of the greatness 
of great men, not only to commit poetry or outstanding prose, 
nor yet to demonstrate a theorem to gain power to demonstrate 
the next theorem and the nest. If learning develops not power 
it is useless except for display. How would the body be 
improved if food taken into the stomach be not digested, if it be not 
incorporated with us, if it did not nourish and sustain us. Oftimes 
we learn and rely so strongly upon the arm of another as to destroy 
our own strength and vigor. 

In plain truth, "the cares and expenses our parents are at in our 
education point at nothing but to furnish our heads with knowledge, 
but not a word of judgment and virtue." 

Education should be the foundation for independent thinking. 



for the stimulation of power, the beginning of definite accomplishment. 
It should be so varied in character as to make one proficient in doing. 
clear headed in judging, rich in friendships and capable of earning in 
original and various ways. 

Too often we take other men's knowledge and opinions on trust. 
In this twentieth century with its superfluity of news sheets, magazines, 
radio broadcasts, and books too numerous by thousands, there is 
grave danger of accepting the statements of others and accepting and 
repeating them as our own. We must make knowledge our own if 
we make learning an avenue to wisdom. Many learned men fail, few 
wise men do. While it is easy to become learned through other men's 
learning, we can never be wise except by our own wisdom. "Wisdom 
is not only to be acquired but to be utilized." 

Burton E. Nelson 



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THE TOWER 1934 



J. Erle GrINMBLL, 

Director of Liberal Arts 





Each succeeding year sees the demand for well rounded teachers 
grow more insistent. A few years ago only instructors of academic 
subjects were expected to be conversant with the general field of 
culture, to be able to turn without embarrassment to the social studies. 
the sciences, mathematics, or literature. Teachers of the vocational 
subjects were usually without degrees and no one expected them to 
teach outside of the field of their specialty or to play an important 
part in the cultural life of the faculty or the community. If their 
English was uncertain and their interests narrow, no one laid the 
blame on the school from which they came. For that matter no one 
considered it of much moment. 

That time has passed with the war songs and maple sugar c.mdy 
and high shoes The school world of today fosters competition never 



dreamed of a dozen or even ten years ago Every man or woman who 
hopes to make a place in the educational sun today must be a specialist, 
but also he must be distinguished for the range and quality of his 
general education. More than one teaching field is necessary. He 
must be prepared to take an equal part among his peers in faculty 
meeting, in the direction of student activities, in administration duties. 

In recognition of the insistent demands of changing society Stout 

has set about the task of providing in full measure what the profession 

demands. Curricula have been examined, revised and enlarged; 

methods have been studied and adopted; standards have been raised- 

Still the work goes on in recognition of the fact that men and women 

of Stout must continue to be welcomed in the field as the best trained 

and educated available 

J, Erle Grinncll 



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THE TOWER 1934 



Clyde A. Bowman, 
Dean of the Sckool of 
Industrial Education 





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As we look about us endeavoring to identify the changing factors 
in our social environment this year, we are reminded of our 
first experience attending a three-ring circus. That early attempt to 
see everything in each ring was crowned with a measure of success 
somewhat similar to many of our present efforts. Nevertheless, we 
begin to see what we believe are new social frontiers. We believe 
we can discern new responsibilities, new problems, and new oppor- 
tunities. 

In 1918 the committee report which resulted in the identification 
of the Cardinal Principles of Secondary Education clarified progress 
in education up to that time and pointed the way for subsequent 
development. The committee report in 193-3 on the Social Economic 
Goals of America has already taken on significance which seems to 
indicate that we again have significant guidance and significant 
interpretation of progress and direction. New definitions of content, 



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sequence, and distribution in adult education, new responsibilities 
in consumer preparation, new enrollment volume, and expanded 
facilities all bring new challenges as practical arts activities take 
their place in general education as well as in the various phases of 
vocational education. 

In the continuous curriculum revision at The Stout Institute, we 
are maintaining constant activity to provide opportunities for in- 
dustrial teachers, both those in training and those in teaching work, 
to keep pace with the educational opportunities and requirements 
as they rapidly develop. While preserving an excellent balance and 
integration in the four years of work, nevertheless, new definitions 
of content, new distributions, new sequences, and new courses give 
evidence of the activity of the college in maintaining its contributions 
as its part of the partnership between the faculty, the undergraduates, 

and the alumni. 

Clyde A, Bowman 



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THE TOWER 1934 




Ruth E. Michaels* 

Dean of the School c 
Home Econor 



"Person* studying in any field of work comr to use the vernacular 
^ of that particular type of work; that is, specialized worJs and 
phrases become part of the everyday language of those who are closely 
associated with the development of the work. Often these same terms 
are not made clear to people working in other fields This is true in 
industry, in medicine, and in many other lines, and is especially true 
in the field of education. So it is with the meaning of home economics, 
and the question is often asked, "What is this educational term supposed 
to cover m courses or curricula?" Educational work in home economics 
first appeared as separate courses under various names in different 
schools As this field of study developed, progressive leaders realized 
the possibilities of it and felt the need of a name that would be broad 
enough to cover the many aspects of the program and specific enough 
to indicate the particular subject matter content 

These earlier courses contained subject matter having the same 
common bases as many of the present day courses. This subject 
matter has been taken from the fields of study represented in the 
solution of the living problems of the family group and has been de- 
termined by the analysis of many family situations. Through such 
studies it has been found that the most important problems of the 



socially worthwhile home have to do with tne close relationship of 
physical and mental health, pertain closely to the economic manage- 
ment of the home and also to those problems having to do with the 
social and civic contacts of the individuals of the family; interpreted 
these three aspects mean that close attention needs to be given to the 
physical needs of the family; that standards for physical and mental 
health must be maintained; that the best relationships among the 
members of all groups are necessary to enrich the personality of each 
individual. As Dr. Dyer has said, "Members of family groups today 
will all be ultimate consumers and as such they must be trained for 
their parts in the economic order. They are members of a social group 
and as such they must appreciate the significance of their standards of 
daily living. They are citizens and therefore they must not only 
profess the need of understanding civic problems, but must also be 
trained for participation ." The subject matter then of home economics 
courses must be selected in reference to these aspects. The curriculum 
must integrate the subject matter from such courses with that from 
other educational fields so that all will contribute toward consumers' 
training, health training, and citizenship training. 

Ruth E- Michaels 



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THE TOWER 1934 



± he teacher's contacts 
are with the human 
spirit. His intimates 
are the heart's eternal 
affirmations. His com- 
rades are the hopes and 
{ears and aspirations 

of others 

— Archibald Rutledge. 




Frida M. Bacmmasn 
Biological Science 



William R. Baker 
Printing 



Arthur G. Brown 
Education 




Louise Buchanan 
Foods 



Earl Burbidce 
Physical Education, Coaching 



Gertrude Callahan 
English 



Lillian Carson 
Related Arts 




Winnona M. Cruise 

Nutrition 



Fred L. Curran 
Industrial Education 



John M. Dawlby 
Political Science and Economics 



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James Dockar 
Sheet Metal, Woodworking 



Harry F. Good 
Auto Mechanics. Electrical 



Daniel Green 

Machine Drafting 



(contact, companion^ 
ship, familiar inter' 
course is the law of 
life for the mind. The 
comradeships of under' 
graduates will never 
breed the spirit of learn' 
ing. The circle must 




H. M. Hansen 
Advanced Woodwork 



Violet Hassler 
Public Speaking, English 



Mrs. Alice S. Houston 
Director of Nursery School 



Lillian Jeter 
Clothing and Related Art 



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Hazel Keeeer 
Honve Economics Education 



Floyd Keith 
General Metal, Sheet Metal 



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Ray Kranzuscm 

Auto Mechanics. Radio. 

Home Mechanics 



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THE TOWER 1934 



be widened. It must 
include the older men, 
the teachers, the men 
for whom life has grown 
more serious and to 
whom it has revealed 
more of its meanings. 
— Woodrow Wilson. 




Mildred Lawton 
Home Administration 



Mabel Leedom 
Chemistry 



Ruth M. Lusby 
Institutional Management 




Mary McCalmont 
Chemistry 



Mrs. Myrna H. Meslow 
Home Economics Education 



H. C. Mono 

Machine Shop Practice, 

Foundry Work, Pattern Making 



Mamie R. Mutt 
Related Art 




Grace Price 

Vocational Home Economics 

Education 



Merle M. Price 

History. English. 

Dean of Men 



Jesse E. Ray 

Architectural Drafting. 

Freehand Drawing, Masonry 



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THE TOWER 1934 




it is the teacher's busi* 
ness to see that the 
onslaught of knowledge 
does not enfeeble. Be- 
tween information and 
intelligence he is to \eep 
the balance true. 
George Herbert Palmer. 



Btxnice Reynolds 
Physical Education 



C. L. Rick 

Mathematics and Science 



Francis P. Robinson 
Education 




Boyd C. Shaper 


F. E. TutrooN 


Hasei Va 


Dorothy Verrell 


History and Social Science 


Mathematics. Science, 


Clothing 


Education, 




Home Mechanics 




Assistant in Nursery School 




LrrrriA Walsh 
Home Economics Education 



Robert L. Welch 
Vocational Industrial Education 




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Ray A. Wicen 
Carpentry. Painting and 
Decorating. Woodwork 



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THE TOWER 1934 



Let us teach better 
than we have ever 
taught before, teach as 
though the whole struc- 
ture of civilization 
rested upon our teach 
ing. That is the su- 
preme need of this hour. 
J. E. M. 




Luella Wricht 
Home Economic* Education 



Isabella Williams 
Biological Sciences 



R. B. Antrim 

Assistant Librarian 




Mrs. W. B. Davison 
Hostess at Lynwood Hall 



Lillian M. Frocgatt 
Library Administration 



B. M. Funk 
Business Manager 



Aletta Monteith 
Executive Secretary 




Gertrude M. O'Brifn 
Registrar 



Helen B. Staverlok 
General Office Clerk 



Theresa Stolen 
College Nurse 



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THE TOWER 1934 




Myrtle Strand 
Assistant Librarian 



Acnes Winston 
Stenographer 



Clara Yoh» 
Stenographer 



tlis faith is in the 
mind of man. He 
teaches younger people 
to he men — -in thinfy 
ing. If he can reach 
that end, he has done 
his wor\. — Alexander 
hiex^lejohn. 



Dr. Julius Blom 
College Medical Examiner 



J. T. Burns 
Chief Engineer and 
Superintendent of Buildings 



Grace M. Dow 
Director of Dormitories 



The educated man is to be discovered by his point of view, by the temper of his mind, 
by his attitude toward life and his fair way of thinking. He can see, he can dis- 
criminate, he can combine ideas and perceive whither they lead; he has insight and 
comprehension. His mind is a practiced instrument of appreciation. He is more apt 
to contribute light than heat to a discussion, and will oftener than another show the 
power of uniting the elements of a difficult subject in a whole view; he has the knowledge 
of the world which no one can have who knows only his own generation or only his 
own task. 

What we should seek to impart in our colleges, therefore, is not so much learning 
as the spirit of learning. You can impart that to young men; and you can impart it to 
them in the three or four years at your disposal. It consists in the power to distinguish 
good reasoning from bad, in the power to digest and interpret evidence, in a habit of 
catholic observation and a preference for the nonpartisan point of view, in an addiction 
to clear and logical processes of thought and yet an instinctive desire to interpret rather 
than to stick in the letter of the reasoning, in a taste for knowledge and a deep respect 
for the integrity of the human mind. It is citizenship of the world of knowledge, but not 
ownership of it. Scholars are the owners of its varied plots, in severalty. 

— Woodrow Wilson 



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THE TOWER 1934 



oeniors 

AT THE CROSSROADS 

With a steady swing and an open brow 

We have tramped the ways together, 

But we're clasping hands at the crossroads now. 

And whether we bleed or whether we smile 

In the leagues that lie before us 

The ways of life are many a mile 

And the work of life's before us. 

Here's luck! 

And a cheer for the years before us! 

You to the left and 1 to the right, 

For the ways of men must sever, 

And it well may be for a day and a night 

And it well may be forever! 

But whether we live or whether we die 

(For the end is past our knowing), 

Here are frank hearts and the open sky. 

Be a fair or ill wind blowing! 

Here's luck! 

In the teeth of all winds blowing. 

— Adapted from Richard Hovey 




John Hock el 

Menomonie, Wisconsin 

President, Senior Class; 

Rifle Club, K. F. S.. 

Marquette-LaSalle 



Annette McDonald 

West Salem, Wisconsin 

Vice-President. Senior Class; 

Home Economics Club . 

Rifle Club 



Mvra Marie Kohl 

Marshfield. Wisconsin 

Secretary, Senior Class; 

S. M. A., Secretary-Treasurer ; 

Marquette-LaSalle . 

Home Economics Club 



Bernie Peterson 

Webster, Wisconsin 

Treasurer, Senior Class; 

Rifle Club; 

Treasurer. F. O. B. 



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THE TOWER 1934 





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EvELVN AdES 

Waupaca, Wisconsin 

Lutheran Students, 

Band, Areme, 

Home Economics Club 



Florence Jean Amidon 

Minneapolis, Minnesota 

W. A. A., President ; 

Home Economics Club: 

Phi Upsilon Omicron 



Elbert Barnhart 

Menomonie, Wisconsin 

Epsilon Pi Tau. President ; 

K.F.S.; Y. M.C. A. 



i he mists brea\and 
are gone; sounds, scents, 
visions of dawn surge 
toward us from the old 
unalien days. The old- 
est things of all go 
gleaming past" . . 




Alviha Bates 

Weston, Wisconsin 

Home Economics Club. 

Marquette LaSalle 



William Baxter 

Menomonie, Wisconsin 

M. A. P., F. O. B. 



Bernhardt Beguhn 

Menonomie, Wisconsin 

Band, Lutheran Students, 

S.T.S. 



Edward Biwer 

Wausau, Wisconsin 

S. T. S. 




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DoROTHf BOODV 

Hudson, Wisconsin 

Girls" Glee Club, Areme; 

Treasurer, Home Economics Club; 

Y. W. C A. 



Ruth Bosselman 

Bassett, Wisconsin 

Science Club, 

Pegasus, 

Home Economics Club 



Wayne Braki:r 

Menomonie, Wisconsin 

•"S" Club 



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THE TOWER 1934 



.Homecomings with 
their laboriously planned 
decorations, their sporv 
taneous gaiety, their 
utter carefreeness, their 
bonfires, floats, sna\e 
dances, and warmth of 
friendliness. . . . 




Robert Bwexir 
Downsville, Wisconsin 
Y. M. C. A.. Metallurgy 



Edward Hjumtr 
Menomonie, Wisconsin 

Lutheran Students 



Martha Bubeck 

Cadott, Wisconsin 

W. A. A., Stoutonia Staff. 

Girls' Glee Club, 

Home Economics Club 




Raymond Burcett 

Whitewater, Wisconsin 

Men's Glee Club, 

Business Manager 



Dorothy Cain 

Menomonie, Wisconsin 

S. M. A., Phi Upsilon Omicron; 

Secretary. S. S. A. 



Erhart G. Carlson 

Ashland, Wisconsin 

Metallurgy 



Clarence Carlson 

Superior, Wisconsin 

•S" Club 



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Robert Chamberlain 

Menomonie, Wisconsin 

P. O B.. Glee Club 



Ivan Davis 

Lake Crystal. Minnesota 

Y. M C A 



Verna Davii 
Winnebago, Wisconsin 
Pegasus, Science Club, 
Home Economics Club 



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THE TOWER 1934 



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Hartvicx DOTSETH 

Knapp, Wisconsin 

Treasurer, Arts and Crafts; 

Orchestra , 

Lutheran Students. 

Y. M. C. A., "S" Club 



Merlin Ekern 

Cameron, Wisconsin 

F. O. B, 

Arts and Crafts t 

Lutheran Students 



Jean Good 

Menomonie, Wisconsin 

S. M. A.. M. A. P., 

Areme 



Ruth Graham 

Roberts,. Wisconsin 

W.A.A.,Pegasus,Y.W.C.A. 

Home Economics Club, 

Stoutonia Staff 



Edward GnANoreN 
Menomonie, Wisconsin 



La Verne Hanson 
Menomonie, Wisconsin 

Band 



C/n the banl{s of La\e 
hi e no m in" Low' 
laughter, the slow^ soft 
sliding of canoes, and 
a drowned city of sky- 
scrapers built of scraps 
of stars and bits of 
shattered moonlight. 




Charles Harmon 

Eau Galle, Wisconsin 

M. A. P., P.O. B. •S'Club. 

Arts and Crafts, 

Marquette-LaSalle 



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Willard Hicks 

Pepin, Wisconsin 

President, Y. M. C A ; 

Metallurgy. Historian 



Emma Herman 
Melrose, Wisconsin 

Pegasus, 
Secretary-Treasurer, Science Club 



LeRov Hostettler 
Durham. North Carolina 



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THE TOWER 1934 



Football games! The 
cold steel fingers of the 
wind prying coats open, 
the tense following of 
the ball, the hoarse 
shoutings for a touch- 
down, the mad cheers 
for a goal won. 



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Ruth Howison 
Menomonie, Wisconsin 
W.A.A.,YW.C.A. 

Science Club, 
Home Economics Club 



Lawrence Hovt 

New Auburn, Wisconsin 

President, K. F. S.; 

M A.P 



Chester Hylland 

Menomonie, Wisconsin 

S. T S., F. O. B., 

"S" Club 




Gladys Ingalls 

Eau Claire, Wisconsin 

Y.W.C.A. 

Vice-President, Science Club; 
Home Economics Club 



Norman Jensen 

Milltown, Wisconsin 

Secretary, Arts and Crafts; 

President, Lutheran Students 

K. F. S., Y MCA, 

Epsilon Pi Tau 



Verna Jensen 

Argyle, Wisconsin 

Treasurer, Y. W. C. A.; 

Home Economics Club, 

Secretary, Lutheran Students; 

M. A P. 




Lilly Johnson 

Proctor, Minnesota 

W. A. A., Y. W.C. A. 

Home Economics Club 



Raymond Johnson 

Menomonie, Wisconsin 

F OB; Treasurer. S.S. A 

Epsilon Pi Tau, 

Stoutonia Staff 



Margaret Kline 

Kaukauna, Wisconsin 

Home Economics Club, 

Y W C. A , Marquette-LaSalle, 

Secretary, Rifle Club 



James Johnston 

Buffalo, Minnesota 

K F. S., 

Y. M. C A., 

S' - Club 



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THE TOWER 1934 




Dances — some in- 
formal and gay and 
unrestrained; some with 
a bright whirl of sili{s 
and satins and bared 
flesh against the somber 
stiffness of tuxedos. 



James Knoble 

Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin 

Metallurgy 



Roy Larson 

Menomonie, Wisconsin 

Editor, Stoutonia; 

Epsilon Pi Tau, 

Y. M.C A..S. T. S. 



Louise Lee 

Catawba, Wisconsin 

Phi Upsilon Omicron; 

Treasurer, Philomathean; 

President, Pegasus Club; 

Home Economics Club 



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John Lehockey 

Iron wood, Michigan 

Arts and Crafts 



Marjorie Leonard 
Fort Atkinson, Wisconsin 

Girl's Glee Club; 

Secretary, Philomathean; 

Secretary, Areme; Young Wings. 

Secretary, S. S. A., 

Sophomore Class Secretary; 

W A. A., Home Economics Club 



Henry Lewis 

Ypsilanti, Michigan 

President. F O B ; 

-8" Club 



OVE M ADSEN 

Menomonie. Wisconsin 
Arts and Crafts 





John Medla 
Cudahy, Wisconsin 
Lutheran Students 



Alvin Michna 

Racine, Wisconsin 

Rind. Orchestra 



Gladys Mik kelson 

Toronto. South Dakota 

Y. W. C A., 

Social Service Cabinet, M. A. P. 

Science Club, 

Home Economics Club. 

Lutheran Students 



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THE TOWER 1934 



Library studying with 
its furtive glances at 
neighbors, sibilant whiS' 
pering, noisy rattling of 
boo\ leaves and note- 
paper, harsh scratching 
of pens, and uneasy 
concentration. . 




Robert Murray 

Janesvtlle, Wisconsin 



Charlotte McCarty 

Osceola, Wisconsin 
Tower, 193J; W. A. A. 
Home Economics Club 



Roy Mittelstadt 

Rusk, Wisconsin 

Metallurgy 





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Harvev Noursf 

Bayfield, Wisconsin 

Arts and Crafts, 

Rifle Club; 

Secretary. Y. M. C. A. 



Harriet Melges 

Redwood Falls, Minnesota 

W. A. A., 

Home Economics Club 



Everis Nelson 
Hurley, Wisconsin 
President, 5. S. A.; 

Epsilon Pi Tau, 
K F.S, M A. P. 



Julius Nelson 

Ashland, Wisconsin 

K. F. S., 

T Club 




Inez Mif.now 

H.irtland, Wisconsin 

Treasurer, Phi Upsilon Omicron; 

Science Club, Girls' Glee Club. 

Home Economics Club 



Mildred Nickel 
Green Bay, Wisconsin 

Hypenan, 

President, Phi Upsilon Omicron; 

Home Economics Club 



Helen Owen 

Downing, Wisconsin 

Lutheran Students, 

Home Economics Club, 

MAP. 



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THE TOWER 1934 




Roderick Purcell 

Zion, Illinois 

■S'" Club; 

Treasurer. S. T. S.; 

President. Y. M C. A ; 

Stoutonia Staff 



John Radtke, 

Rice Lake, Wisconsin 

Ma rq uette-LaSa lie , 

Metallurgy 



Harold Rasmussen 

Racine, Wisconsin 

Lutheran Students. 

Orchestra, 

Arts and Crafts. 

Tower, 1933 



Virginia Rav 
Menomonie, Wisconsin 
Phi Upsilon Omicron. 
Home Economics Club 



Marian Rhiel 

Elmwood, Wisconsin 

S. M, A., 

Phi Upsilon Omicron, 

President, Home Economics Club 



Prances Roush 

Webster, Wisconsin 

( iirls' Glee Club, 

Home Economics Club, 



{^lasses in which we 
have learned and laughed 
and cried — -or even 
slept. Teachers with 
whom we have agreed 
and argued, wor\ed and 
played, walked and 
ta\\ed 




Marguerite Roettiger 

Fountain City, Wisconsin 

Y. W. C. A.. Lutheran Students.. 

Home Economics Club, 

Girls" Glee Club 





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Charles Rom in e William Rowe 

Madison, Wisconsin Hancock, Michigan 

K.F.S Mens Glee Club 



Harold Sack 

Savannah, Georgi.i 
Y M C. A., Arts and Crafts 



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THE TOWER 1934 



And now Commence 
menu the end which is 
a beginning, the turn 
at the crossroads. With 
a smile and a sigh we 
go on and drini{ a toast 
to 




Howard Sandvig 

Menomonie, Wisconsin 

Lutheran Students, 

Y M.C. A. 



Arthur Scheptner 

Milwaukee, Wisconsin 

Band, 

Orchestra 



Arthur Schwartz 
Menomonie, Wisconsin 

Marquette-LaSalle; 
Vice-President, F. O. H ; 

Stoutonia Staff 




Forrest Sissil 
Muscatine, Iowa 

S. T. S . 

Arts and Crafts, 

Stoutonia Staff; 

Tower, 1933; 

Manager, Cheer Leaders 



Arthur Sours 

Kenosha, Wisconsin 

M. A. P . 

Band 



Carmen Spreiter 

Menomonie. Wisconsin 

Philomathean, Tower, 

Stoutonia Staff, 

Girls' Glee Club. 

Home Economics Club. 

Band, Young Wings 



Borden Steeves 

Ansonia, Connecticut 
F O B„ 
S. T. S 



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M *3 


•4 


% 



Dorothy Stfpp 
Eau Claire. Wisconsin 

Y W C A. 
Home Economics Club 



George Stewart 

Palmyra. Wisconsin 

Rifle Club 



Lila Storandt 

Mindoro, Wisconsin 

Science Club, Y. W.C. A. 

Home Economics Club 



/ 



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{J7r 



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THE TOWER 1934 



i -a i 


S 


H 



Our pasts —they go, 
they stay. There is no 
moment which dies un- 
forgot. From wonder 
unto wonder do we go; 
we need but lift our 
bare expectant hands." 



Da Mb Stori 


George Town p. 


June Trastex 


Menomonie, Wisconsin 


Waupun, Wisconsin 


Manitowoc. Wisconsin 


F. O. B. 


Metallurgy 


Pegasus. Y. W. C. A., 


"S" Club. 




W. A. A., M. A. P.. 


Football 




Home Economics Club 




Howard Valska 

Altoona, Wisconsin 

Arts and Crafts, 

Y. M C A 



June Very 

Menomonie, Wisconsin 

President, Areme; 

Girls' Glee Club 



Donald Williams 
Menomonie, Wisconsin 
V M C. A 



Lloyd Wilson 
Minong, Wisconsin 
S. T. S-, Rifle Club, 
Ma rq uettC'LaSa I le 




Herbert WOMOWKl 

Menomonie, Wisconsin 

F. O. B 



Merlin Wolske 
Menomonie, Wisconsin 



Harold Zastrow 
Superior, Wisconsin 



) 



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0«r 



THE TOWER 1934 



SENIORS WHOSE PICTURES DO NOT APPEAR 



Geraxj) Covey 
Menomonie, Wisconsin 



Earl Smith 
Waukegan, Illinois 
S. T. S., Lutheran Students, 
Stoutonia Staff 



Lloyd Decker 
Menomonie, Wisconsin 



Harold Stroziniky 
Menomonie, Wisconsin 
MAP., Football 



Gladvs Lvnum 

Baldwin, Wisconsin 

Hyperian, 

Home Economics Club 



Joseph Trinko 

Menomonie, Wisconsin 

Metallurgy 



David Maceay 
Platteville, Wisconsin 



Mildred Voss 
Mayville, Wisconsin 
S. M. A., Rifle Club 



JUNIORS WHOSE PICTURES DO NOT APPEAR 



Dacnv Andaeassen 
Earl Bpcxman 
Wendell Bennetts 
Marion Brown 
Mary Jane Cole 
Paul Daugherty 
Gerald Decker 
Helen Diedrich 
Richard Dixon 
Hal Gilker 



Olive Hylland 
Herbert Jack 
RtchardKlatt 
Gertrude Lotwin 
George McCourt 
George Millenbach 
Gordon O'Connell 
Leonard Oass 
Paul Reinhard 
Matt Vukelich 



I 







'% 



THE TOWER 1934 



SPRING 

The dew'drenched lilac sprays of spring. 
The altar-candle stars, 
The sun that lays her beauty down 
In gilded taper-bars; 

A broad green river flowing warm, 
And rain across the trees, 
A windless tapestry of sky, 
And young leaves' litanies; 

A moon that twists her flaxen braids 
Across the drifting grass, 
Anemones that dance the song 
Of rocking winds that pass — 

I'll make of these a silver knife 
To cut my laughter free: 
I'll make of these a twisting flame 
To warm the heart of me. 

— Carmen Spreiter 




\ 



{40} 



THE TOWER 1934 



Juni 



ors 



TO-DAY 

To be alive in such an age ! 
With every year a lightning page 
Turned in the world's great wonder book 
Whereon the yearning nations look. 

To be alive in such an age — 

To live in it, 

To give to it! 

Look at the work the times reveal ! 

Give thanks with all thy flaming heart — 

Crave but to have in it a part. 

Give thanks and clasp thy heritage — 

To be alive in such an age! 

— Angela Morgan 




Cham.es Peterson 


Mary Swbton 


Dorothy Strew 


William Pearson 








Rib Lake, Wisconsin 


Washburn. Wisconsin 


Durand. Wisconsin 


Superior. Wisconsin 








President. Junior Class; 


Vice-President. Junior Class; 


Secretary. Junior Class; 


Treasurer. Junior Class; 




/ 




F. O. B.. 


Home Economics Club; 


Home Economics Club; 


K. F. S.. 




^ 


Epsilon Pi Tau 


Secretary. Hyperian; 


Vice-President, Philomathean; 


Rifle Club 




111 




MarquetteLaSalle. 


W. A A .. 












Science Club. Y. W. C A; 


M. A P.. 








j<- 




Vice-President. Pegasus 


Marquette-LaSalle 








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THE TOWER 1934 




lhree years have passed 
since we came down 
the shaded wall{s from 
home to campus, over 
highway twelve, or Red 
Cedar's high trestle, to 
wal\ through swinging 
doors into college life. 



Evelyn Alum 

Bessemer. Michigan 

Home Economics Club. 

Y. W. C. A 



Alvord 
Appleton. Wisconsin 
Vice-President. Hyperian; 
Home Economics Club 



Selma Anderson 
Osseo. Wisconsin 

Y. W. C A . 
Lutheran Students 




Stuart Anderson 

Mcnomonie, Wisconsin 

Vice-President. K F. S . 

Treasurer. M. A. P.; 

Men's Glee Club 



Harry Beach 

Madison. Wisconsin 

Arts and Crafts. 

Cheer Leader 



Charles Behrincer 

Manitowoc. Wisconsin 

•S" Club. 

P. O. B 



Ralph Betterly 

Elmwood. Wisconsin 

K. F S.. Orchestra. 

Epsilon Pi Tau; 

President. Band; Tower. 

Men's Glee Club 





Clippord Bjornson 

Mcnomonie, Wisconsin 

Ri9e Club 



Alex Booaard 

Abbotsford. Wisconsin 

K.F.S., 

TC 

Marquette-LaSalle 



Doris Bradley 
Mcnomonie, Wisconsin 

S. M. A.. Tower. 
Home Economics Club. 
Phi Upsilon Omicron 



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<42 f 



THE TOWER 1934 



HAch day we have 
minted new coins for 
the strong-box of memo* 
ry—gay wealth to 
treasure through the 
slow processional of 
days and nights to come. 




Carl Brenner 

East Orange, New Jersey 

•■S" Club. 

Y M. C. A.. 

Stoutonia Staff 



Edward Bressler 

Menomonie, Wisconsin 

Rifle Club. 

Lutheran Students 



Rosamond Carlson 

Eau Claire. Wisconsin 

Home Economics Club, 

Arcme. Y. W. C. A., 

Lutheran Students 




Reuben Carp 

Charleston, West Virginia 

S. T. S., 

F. O. B.. 

Stoutonia Staff 



LeRoy Charlick 

Highland, Michigan 

Arts and Crafts 



Marian Chase 

Oshkosh, Wisconsin 

Home Economics Club. 

Philomathean; 
Y. W. C. A.. Cabinet 



Elizabeth Christopherson 

Superior. Wisconsin 

Treasurer. Lutheran Students; 

Pegasus. Science Club. 

Glee Club. Tower. 
Home Economics Club 




Ernest Corosolla 

Ironwood, Michigan 

"8" Club. 

F. O. B. 



Lloyd Crane 

Chippewa Falls. Wisconsin 



Frederick Curran 

Menomonie. Wisconsin 

Epsilon Pi Tau. K. F. S; 

Vice-President. Men's Glee Club 






\4i} 



I 




THE TOWER 1934 




I he pulsing hum of 
engines, the white glare 
of furnaces, the angry 
hiss of hot type in 
water, the shrill whir 
of the saws, the taut 
crackle of shavings. 



Lucille Da mm 

Columbus, Wisconsin 

Treasurer, Hyperian; 

W. A. A, Y. W.C. A.. 

Science Club. 

Marquette-LaSalle 

Home Economics Club 



Virna Damm 

Columbus, Wisconsin 

President. Hyperian; 

President. Inter-Society; 

Phi Upsilon Omicron, 

Treasurer, Home Economics Club; 

Science Club Marquette-LaSalle 



Eugene Doyle 

Mcnomonie, Wisconsin 

Epsilon Pi Tau. 

S. T. S. 

Tower. 

Marquette'LaSalle 




Ernest Ebert 

Superior, Wisconsin 

K. F.S.. 

Y. M.C. A. 



LUFLLA ErICKSON 

Virginia. Minnesota 

Home Economics Club. 

Vice-President. Y. W. C. A.; 

Science Club, 

Phi Upsilon Omicron 



Lloyd Erpenbach 

Elk Mound. Wisconsin 

Marquette-LaSalle 



\ 



Lucille Fleming 

Glenwood City. Wisconsin 

Glee Club. 

Y. W. C. A.. 

Home Economics Club 



««' 



I 



Rose Forno 

Bessemer. Michigan 

Marquette-LaSalle, 

Hyperian, Science Club, 

Home Economics Club; 

Secretary. W. A. A.; 

Secretary-Treasurer. Pegasus 



Albert Feirer 

Menomonie, Wisconsin 

Men's Glee Club. 

K. F. S.. 

M. A. P. 




He is rich Gaertner 

Neenah. Wisconsin 

Treasurer. K. F. S; 

President. "S" Club; 

Football. 

Basketball 



444 r 



THE TOWER 1934 



wi.cn in coveralls and 
paint-smeared aprons, 
men with in\- smudged 
fingers, men holding 
planers and yardsticks 
are fused into the bright 
steel coins of the shops. 




James Govin 

Menomonie. Wisconsin 

Metallurgy 



Jane G* 

Menomonie. Wisconsin 

Vice-President. S. M. A. 

M. A. P.. Areme. 

Girls' Glee Club 



Harriet Gunderson 

Hibbing. Minnesota 

Y. W. C. A.. 

W. A A . 

Home Economics Club 




Virginia Gunz 

Oshkosh. Wisconsin 

Girls* Glee Club, 

Home Economics Club. 

S. M. A. 



Carl Haase 

Milwaukee. Wisconsin 

Vice-President. Y. M. C. A. 

Treasurer. S. T. S.; 

Rifle Club 



Paul Ha- 
Menomonie. Wisconsin 
Marquette-LaSalle 



Janice H inn- int. 

Fountain City, Wisconsin 

Areme. Science Club. 

Y. W. C. A.. 
Home Economics Club 




George Hislop 
Racine. Wisconsin 

Stoutonia. 
Lutheran Students 



El-nice Hock en brock 
Eau Claire. Wisconsin 

Pegasus. Hyperian. 

Home Economics Club. 

Vice-President. S. S. A.; 

Student Publication Board 



Woodrus Horman 

Sleepy Eye. Minnesota 

Metallurgy, 

Band. 
Orchestra 



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US} 



i 




THE TOWER 1934 




El WOOD HUCHDAHL 

Bensenville, Illinois 

Men's Glee Club. 

Orchestra 



Doris Jepeery 

Shullsburg, Wisconsin 

President. Philomathean. 

Home Economics Club, 

Girls' Glee Club. Areme 



Grace Johnson 
Bessemer. Michigan 
Secretary. S. M. A.; 

Pegasus 



The gold'brown love 
liness of cak.es and 
muffins, the starched 
whiteness of uniforms, 
the gleam of sunlight 
on the rows of glass* 
bottled chemicals. . 




Harry Keller 

Menomonie, Wisconsin 

Men's Glee Club; 

Editor. Tower; Orchestra, 

Band, F. O B. 



Ramona Klatt 

Menomonie. Wisconsin 

Home Economics Club. 

Tower, 

S. M. A. 



Viola Larson 
Minneapolis. Minnesota 
President. V W. C. A.; 

Editor. Stoutonia; 
Treasurer. Pallas Athene 



Clarence Ledin 
Superior. Wisconsin 




\ 



Karl Lour 

Battle Creek, Michigan 

Arts and Crafts. 

Young Wings, 

Tower, S. T. S. 



Benjamin Lohrie 

Elmwood, Wisconsin 

Marque tte-LaSalle . 

Men's Glee Club. 

M. A. P. Band 



Robert Macaulbv 

Menomonie, Wisconsin 

Stoutonia Staff. 

Young Wings 



m 



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<46> 



THE TOWER 1934 



Laughing voices of girls 
and children, the quic\ 
snip of scissors, through 
sil\ or woolen, the 

smooth moulding of 
material — these are 
minted for the Home 
Economics groups. 




Clarence McClellan 

Menomonie, Wisconsin 

President, Metallurgy; 

M. A. P. 



Russell May 

Downing, Wisconsin 

Y. M. C A 



Helmer Martinson 

Eau Claire. Wisconsin 

Lutheran Students, 

Stoutonia Staff. Y. M. C A 




Cordelia Moody 

Menomonie. Wisconsin 

Lutheran Students, 

Girls' Glee Club. 

W. A. A. 



Vincent Myrick 

Elk Mound, Wisconsin 

Rifle Club. 

Y. M. C. A. 



Mary Louise Nibbe 

Chippewa Falls. Wisconsin 

Home Economics Club, 

President, Glee Club; 

Treasurer, S. M . A . . 

Y. W.C A W A A 



Alice Nichols 

Mount Hone. Wisconsin 

Home Economics Club. 

Y. W. C. A . 

W. A A 




John Patrick O'Connor 

Menomonie. Wisconsin 

Treasurer, Marquette-LaSallc, 

F O. B . M. A. P. 



Lester Puhl 

Menomonie. Wisconsin 

"S" Club. 

S.T.S 



Marlys Richert 

Menomonie. Wisconsin 

Home Economics Club; 

President. S. M. A.; Areme 






<47> 







THE TOWER 1934 




Harlow Roate 

Appleton. Wisconsin 

S. T. S. 



One year left! May 
we \eep our coins un- 
tarnished by regrets and 
forge a master coin of 
men with flame and 
vision, and women with 
loveliness and truth 



Charles Rowe 

Beloit. Wisconsin 

"S" Club. K. F. S., 

Tower. Arts and Crafts 



Myrtle Rowe 
Eau Claire. Wisconsin 
Home Economics Club 




Delta Schroeder 
Platteville, Wisconsin 
Home Economics Club. 
Philomathean. Tower 



Francis Shaw 
Fond du Lac. Wisconsin 
Arts and ( 



Robert Sherman 

Hibbing. Minnesota 

Arts and Crafts. 

Tower 



Erlinc Swensen 

Madison. Wisconsin 

S. T. S . F O. B. 




\ 



Grace Watson 

Appleton. Wisconsin 

W. A. A.. 

Science Club 



Lawrence Wolske 

Menomonie. Wisconsin 

Lutheran Students. 

M. A. P . 

Tower 



Harland Woodworth 

Black River Falls, Wisconsin 

Epsilon Pi Tau, •"S" Club; 

Secretary. K. F. S.; 
Treasurer. Sophomore I 






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<48> 



THE TOWER 1934 




Frances Gregg 
1915-1934 



Her quiet nature seemed to be 

Tuned to each season's harmony. 

The holy sky bent near to her; 

She saw a spirit in the stir 

Of solemn woods. The rills that beat 

Their mosses with voluptuous feet, 

Went dripping music through her thought. 

Sweet impulse came to her unsought 

From graceful things. 

— Horatio Powers 




<49> 



/ 



THE TOWER 1934 



Soph 



pnomores 



W* 4r fl 

A 1 


Hb*- 1 








1 '"' '" ^rW 



John Feiefe. 
Pteiidenl 


Lou he Owen, 
Vice- President 


Mart Fin NiV. 
Secretary 


Jamm Cinum. 
Trea«urer 


Robert Ainuer 


Charles Acnolde 


DoiOTKT BAUN 


VK *-^H 


L^Rwt " H 


|p% •- 


Hit * a 


B**t * 1^1 


Hi* - 1W 


R«^ *• fl 








&> > fl 




r^rHr^bv* v rH^H 





Myrtle Beelen Orv«tta Bracer Lawrence BrAATeh Mtiaw Biais Evilen Biqwn Ruth Buhcc Natalie Burn ham 




Dorothf Darling 


Bettt Ann Dotle 


Oscar Emiibrtjon 


MilheboEnli 


DoRIS EpSTUN 


Marie Erpimbach 


A 


n Fuller 




Pfe%*l 


H*** m-m 


Bt^fl 


- 1 

M 

L*2 


ml* 1 







Constance Garrison Steve Giovannini BiRHAOiwt Gore Mrs.. Dora Gri»pin Marguerite Hankwiti Erwin Hanson Lillian Hammh 



.fc^ 1 


lE^^J 


pt *■ 


\*+ ' 


¥ i J 


■| #- j 



Ralph Harmon Marcah Hunt Merle Hill Wallace Hour. Dorothy Howison Hubert Hugs* 



H> * ^H LV afl ■H*' / i A 



Elizabeth Hunter Charles Johnson Lawrence Kaiser Walter Kuiach Hairy Kubalec 



It 



>^ 




{50H 



Sophomores 



THE TOWER 1934 




Gk*cb LamcaiTib Adelaide Labjon Pheixu Laubbmann John Ludvttoon Uonabd LuMDELt Ma*» Malcolm Mabion McEacheon 




Jamh McLiod 


JAUD MbANHC 


Ibua MlLLEB 


HuaHrrr Molttau 


Aon is Mullen 


Raona Muuih 


Maeie Mlibbat 


Lrl 


u*+ 5 


B^* k 1 


h*H 


b*f •- ■ 


P 1 * 1 


Bt^<*fl 




B 1 fl 




e^eev " I 




m - - M 




\3 : 






■k 1 








Bunabd Nit 


HOW AID OlMH 


V/illjau Olson 


VlVIAH PaTBICE 


Inez Piceibiho 


Juanit a Pbatt 


KrBer PbIce 




LOBENCE RuEIINK F«ANE Ruffl ANNA ScHBBNBCEBB MaIIHE ScMULTT EDWIN SiiFIBT JoTCE SmAPEE AuELIA SmiLAHfCH 




Dobb Shotbnboi Eirim SrAULWNO Aohes Steihee Caboltn Stubmeb Edith Swan Elaine Thouas 



Bt^l 







Glenn Voir Leo Wmibh Stlvta WoithimoTON MABirrTA Ziehm 




( 



{51} 



/ 



THE TOWER 1934 



Freshmen 



La II ! i' L.il .v. 



Jam MlLNK. 


Watnb GatpriN, 


DohothtGardnbr, 


John Curto, 


L*rn Ait 


Emilt/ 


Lndiuon 


Pieudent 


Vke-Pre*ident 


Secretary 


Trea Hirer 










B^v\ *** 






^b*r *MA 







CLAUHCI AlMTlON 


Huvit Baier 


Agdue Barho 


FLORENCE BlCI.BR 


Doru Blumee 


Elbanore Brown 


K* -I 


K\» 


■* # *L K 


r* " < 


L' 1 


p}*-l 



Piter Ch*htia«on Myrtle Goltbr 



Elliott , Credo 



MahtCukhah' Dorothy Davison fount Doliu 



*1 fc** fc*I r^l i m * 



EvaEclhoh Euanor Flanagan James Flynn Dobotht Fordham Lorraiw. Fume 



BlRNICE GtEHART 



Helen Good 









J 



AqhbjHbd Ha»t Henduciion Erica Hlkwio Mildred HrreriER 




Maii Virginia Hipii Ruth Jaueion 



Veen (Bwerr Blanche Klinker 



\ 



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) 



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{52} 



THE TOWER 1934 



Freshmen 




VlLQIMIA KlIHI 


John Kraft 


Arnold Lbs 


AuDitr LiBf «t 


Jam Ma>tin 




MlLDK'D M»»TlM 


B*** '1 


H«ww *-M 




Bb*! 


H) «*' 




HP% «>l 


k 'il 




w. / 


L <m 




^^ 


Li. _^M 



JlANME MtCAFrMV 


Mauoh Millek 


Ma&ciliikite Moutoi 


GexnAHDT NeuBAur» 


Loua 


N] Nivudahl 


Vbrkbita Nutteh 


B»* 














V * fa- 


^^v »* 


■«^| 


^^^Hh *~ ^H 






1"* '^ 


Mr a 


HL:H 


^L > ^H 


I v * J 




1 _^_ jk 





Do»otht Ousted Evibt ( Vriou 




Ghaki.es Zeicinoei 



Ma«ii Pwc 



Kathhtn Rici 



Roniitr RobiIitj 



Ehne.it- Scmlossk 




HauhdSchuu Donald Schwae/ti Makmhit Sjolandee Beenic 



Elner Steimee. 



Lois Stye» 






David Thouas Hilih Tiuwieuaw Jaxi Wuksuin Robert Whalet 



Stilla Wood 



iKY 



I 



A 



THE TOWER 1934 




What is this life if, full of care. 
We have no time to' stand and stare. 
No time to see, in broad daylight. 
Streams full of stars, like skies at night. 
A poor life this if, full of care, 
We have no time to stand and stare. 

— William Henry Davies 



<54> 




c 



ollege 



Lif. 



THE TOWER 1934 



THE STOUT STUDENT ASSOCIATION 

- - - - Every student enrolled in the college is a member 
of the Stout Student Association. The four officers are 
elected annually by the student body, in May preceding 
their terms of office, which begin at the opening of the 
school year, the following September. 

The officers plan an extensive program of student 
activities and formulate the school calendar. They 
reflect the attitudes of the student body and represent 
that body in all school procedures. 

In short, with the administrative officers of the 
college, they handle the welfare of the college itself. 



Officers: 



Everis Nelson 
Eunice Hockenbrock 
Dorothy Cain- 
Raymond Johnson 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 





Events Nehon 



Eunice Hockenbrock 



Dorothy Cain 



Raymond Johnson 



<57> 



/ 




THE TOWER 1934 



Sta§ 



Harry Keller 
Doris Bradley 
Charles Rowe 
Karl Lohr * 
Helen Diedrich 
Ramona Klatt 
Eugene Doyle 
Sophie Jeatran 



Editor 

Associate Editor 

- Business Manager 

Advertising Manager 

Organization Editor 

Organization Editor 

Organization Editor 

Literary Editor 



THE TOWER STAFF OF 1934 

' ' - ' Like the piping of the Pied Piper of Hamelin which 
drew forth all the rats in town, the compiling of the 
interests and events of the past year at Stout in the 
yearbook has called out every effort of the 1934 Staff. 
Nights! - - Days! - - A Year! ! we have trailed the 
call. On February twenty-fourth, our Piper changed his 




Mas Callahan 
Elizabeth Christopherson 



Mr. Baker 
Helen Diedrich 



Ralph Betterlet 
Eugene Doyle 



Doris Braolet 
Sophie Jeatran 



\ 



\S8} 



THE TOWER 1934 



steady march of work for the merry strains of The 
Bowery. Gayly, with roguish backward glance— he 
led us on to the Tacky Drag and a rakish group of revellers. 
But only for a night; then once more we followed the 
ponderous chords of the working march until out of 
ideas piled like Jack-straws we had developed our theme. 
"The students who work and play under the shadow 
of The Tower." 



Carmen Sprieter - , . literary Editor 

Ralph Betterley - . , Athletic Editor 

Betty Christopherson - - Athletic Editor 

Lawrence Wolske - Feature and Art Editor 

Robert Sherman- . , . Snapshot Editor 

Delta Schroeder Typist 

Miss Callahan Adviser 

Mr. Baker Adviser 




Harry Keller 
Delta Schroeder 




Ramona Klatt 
Robert Sherman- 


Karl Lohr 
Carmen Spreiter 


Charles Rowe 
Lawrence Wolske 

I 


/ 


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1) 



{59* 



/ 



THE TOWER 1934 



Staff: 



Paul Doyle 
Roy Larson 
Earl Smith 
Viola Larson 
Carl Brenner 
Mr. Baker 



Editor'in'Chief 

> Editor 

Managing Editor 

- Desk Editor 

Business Manager 

Adviser 



THE STOUTONIA STAFF 

- ' ' ' The Stoutonia, the weekly college paper, is made 
a reality, through the strenuous efforts of a co-operative 
staff. The staff members, chosen by the Student Publi' 
cation Board and an Advisory Council, endeavor to 
preserve the constant current of college life and activity. 





\ 



Carl Brenner 

Paul Doyle 

Raymond Johnson 



Ruth Bubeck 
Ruth Graham 
Harry Kubalek 



Martha Bubeck 
George Hblop 
Viola Larsen 



) 



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<60> 



THE TOWER 1934 



through the use of the printed page. This year the 
Stoutonia Staff produced a series of papers, which in- 
cluded cleverly written Extras. The Stoutonia Staff 
also made it possible for the student body to obtain 
weekly Collegiate Digests. 



Earl Smh-h 
Viola Larson 
Harlow Roate - 
Sylvia Worthington 
Harry Kubalek - 
Art Schwartz 



Editor-in-Chiej 

' Editor 

Managing Editor 

- Des\ Editor 
Ma^cup'EditOT 

- Sports Editor 




Roy Larson 

Roderick Purcell 

Earl Smith 



Ibn Lewis 
Harlow Roate 
Art Schwartz 



Robert Macalt.ev 

Forrest Sbsel 

Sylvia Worthington 



/ 



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Ulf 



/ 




THE TOWER 1934 



Officers: 



Doris Jeffrey 
Dorothy Strese » 
Marjorie Leonard 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 



PHILOMATHEANS 

- - - - The Philomathean Literary Society aims to pro- 
mote the love of higher learning and the social interests 
of the college through a series of meetings devoted to 
art, literature, music, and drama. 

Every year the society offers a scholarship, earned 




Mm. Wilson 


SWTON 


Orvetta Brake r 


Natalie Bushham 


Marion Chaw 


Dorothy Darling 


BrrrY Dovu 


Mary Finney 


MlLDRED HeTACER 


Elizabeth Hunter 


Doris Jeffrey 


Virginia >' 






' 



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{62} 



THE TOWER 1934 



entirely through the efforts of the members, to a Fresh- 
man girl. The organization participates in many of the 
school events and is particularly active in the promotion 
of school spirit. It joins the other societies in sponsoring 
the annual Mid- Winter Ball, as well as in carrying on a 
social program within the society. 



Officers: 



Louise Lee - 
Miss Lawtos 
Mrs. Paul Wilson 



Treasurer 

Adviser 

Associate Adviser 




Louse Lee 


Marjorie Leonard 




Audrey Libert 


Marian McEachron 






Alice Nichols 


Dorothy Omsted 




Louise Owen 


Delta Schroeder 






Joyce Shafer 


Eleanor Steiner 




Dorothy Stress 


Sylvia Worthinoton 




! 














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<63> 








< 



THE TOWER 1934 



Officers: 



Versa Damm 
Evelyn Alvord 
Mary Swiston 



President 

ViccPresident 

Sccretar 



HYPERIANS 

' ' - - "Culture, not show" is the Hyperian motto. 
Its colors, yellow and white, express the loyalty and 
truth which the Hyperian girls have upheld for eleven 
years. 

This year, as a result of their interest in social service 
work, they are sending two children to nursery school. 

Social functions have also found a place in the society's 



• 











Mm Wright 


Mrs. Davison 


Evelyn Alvord 


Verna Damm 






Lucille Damm 


Dorothy Davison 


Rose Porno 


Ann Fuller 


rfflfe* 




Dorothy Gardner 


Btrnadine Gore 


Marguerite Hankwit: 


Mary Virginia Hipke 


m 


\ 










««# 










(■■ 













> 



164} 



THE TOWER 1934 



program. Among these were rushing functions, a formal 
buffet supper and deck party, the annual homecoming 
breakfast, the Berea Exhibit, teas, dances, and picnics. 
A most delightful winter event was a dinnerdance at 
Cafe LaCorte. 

The Hyperian scotties have accompanied the members 
to various school activities. Thus ends another year 
for Hyperians. 



Officers: 



Lucille Damm 
Luella Wright - 
Mrs. W. B. Davison 



Treasurer 

Adxnser 

Associate Adviser 




eunki hockenbrock 

Mildred Nickel 
Margaret Sjolander 



Jane Martin 

Racna Mullen 

Amelia Smilanich 



Irma Miller 

Allouke Overbeck 

Mary Swbton 



Acnes Mullen 

Vernetta Nutter 

Jane Washburn 



/ 



( 



<65> 



/ 



THE TOWER 1934 



Officers: 



MARLYS RlCHERT 

Jane Green 
Grace Johnson 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 



S. M. A. 

- - - - S.M.A was organized in 1922 for the purpose 
of building firm bonds of friendship among girls of like 
interests and ideals. It is primarily a social organization, 
but it carries on several non-social activities. It maintains 
a Student Loan Fund, which is available to any deserving 




J 

. f 






Miss Jeter 


Mrs. Carter 


Emily Anderson 


Doris Blumer 


Doris Bradley 


Merceda Braun 


Dorothy Cain 


Mary Curiam 


Eleanor Flanacan 


Helen Good 


Jean Good 


Jans Green 



> 



<66> 



THE TOWER 1934 



student in the college. Annually, charity work is done 
at Thanksgiving and Christmas for several needy families 
of the city. The society participates in all school ac- 
tivities. Every year it is a joint sponsor of the Mid- 
winter Formal; in addition, it gives its own Spring 
dinner dance. 



Officers: 



Mary Louise Nibbe 
Miss Jeter - 
Mrs. John Carter 



Treasurer 

Adviser 

Associate Adviser 




Virginia Guni 

Grace Johnson 

Mary Louise Nibbe 



Ramona Klatt 

Marie Kohl 

Marian Rhiel 



Marian Herpst 
Mary Malcolm 
Marlys Richert 



Sophie Jeatran 
Marie Murray 
Helen Diedrich 




<67> 



THE TOWER 1934 



Officers: 



Henry Lewis 
Art Schwartz 
Edward Schwartz 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 



PHI OMEGA BETA 

- - - - Although Phi Omega Beta is primarily a men's 
social organization, it is indefatigable in its efforts to 
arouse school spirit and to promote attendance at 
athletic competitions. This year the F. O. B.'s introduced 
the "Little Old Jug" as a symbol of the football rivalry 
between The Stout Institute and Eau Claire Teachers 
College. The Stout team won; to-day the Little Old Jug 





William Baxter 


Charles Behringer 


Reuben Carp 


Robert Chambers* 


Joe Dolejs 


James Einum 


Merlin Ekern 


Charles Harmon- 


Henry Harmon 


Chester Hylland 


Raymond Johnson 


Harry Keller 



) 



\ 



<68> 



THE TOWER 1934 



squats smugly in the trophy case in the library. 

Other pep drives sponsored by the F. O. B.'s this 
year were organization of bigger and better pep as- 
semblies before football games, and the chartering of 
two buses to transport rooters to the La Crosse game. 

In intramural sports, the F. O. B.'s demonstrated as well 
■is encouraged good sportsmanship and school spirit. 

Their Apache dance was one of the best attended 
dances of the college year. 



Officers: 



Ernest Corsolla 
David Stori 
Mr. Good - 



Treasurer 

Sergcant'dt'Arms 

Adviser 




Henry Lewi* 

Robert Roberts 

Herbert Wodjowsky 



James Mezza.no 
Borden Steeves 
J. M. Dawley 



Patrick O'Connor 

David Stori 

Earl Burbidge 



Bernie Peterson 

Art Schwartz 



( 



i69f 



/ 




THE TOWER 1934 



Officers: 



Lawrence Hoyt - 
Stuart Anderson 
Harland Woodworth 



KAPPA PHI SIGMA 

- - - - Kappa Phi Sigma was organized in 1930 for the 
President p romo tion of social life among the men of the college. 
Vice-President Knowledge, Friendship and Society — the threefold 
Secrcta-m objective, was secured this year by group dinners for 

the discussion of various problems, by addresses by 




Mr Ray 
Ralph Betterley 



(I* 



\ 



Robert Aincer 


Stuart Anderson 


Elbert Barnhart 


Lawmho Braatts 


Frederick Curran 


Albert Feirer 




John Feirer 


Ernejt Ebert 



<70} 



THE TOWER 1934 



outside speakers, by active support of athletics, and by 
presentation of a scholarship. 

The organization takes a prominent part in all school 
enterprizes, homecoming events, and intramural sports. 

The annual Spring dinner dance was a successful and 
fitting climax to the group's social program. 



Heinrich Gaertker 
John Hockel 
Mr. Rav * 
Mr. Shafer 



Treasurer 

Sergeant'tit-arms 

Adviser 

Adviser 




Oscar Embertson 


Heinrich Gaertnfr 


John- Hockel 


James Johnston 


Everis Nelson- 


Julius Nelson 


Charles Romint 


Charles Rowe 


Harland Woodworth 



/ 



{71} 



THE TOWER 1934 



Officers: 



John Lehockby 
Harry Beach 



ARTS AND CRAFTS 

- - - ' Arts and Crafts is an organization of students 
President W ^ Q ^ ave met ^^^ scholastic requirements, and who 

Vice-President are interested in promoting the worthy use of leisure 
through the medium of hobbies. 





Harry Beach 

Erus Hanson 

Harry Kubalek 



LrROY Charlicx 
Charles W. Harmon- 
Karl Lohr 



Hartvick Dotseth 

Norman JnOBi 

Ovz Madsen 



\ 



■|72> 



THE TOWER 1934 



Through the club activities this year, members became 
acquainted with various avocations, and completed 
many useful artistic projects. The choices of the different 
members represented all fields of Industrial Arts. 



Norman Jensen * 
Hartvick Dotseth 
Mr. Kranzusch * 



Secretary 

Treasurer 

Adviser 




Harvey Nounsr 
Charles Rowe 
David Thomas 



Francis Shaw 

Harold Sack 

George Town* 



Robert Sherman 

Forrest Sbjq. 
Howard Valska 



( 



473> 



/ 



THE TOWER 1934 



Officers: 



Norman Jensen 
Erwin Hanson 
Verna Jensen 



THE LUTHERAN STUDENTS 

- - - - The Lutheran Students Association includes the 

President ent i re enrollment of Lutherans in the college. This year 

Vice-President the group engaged in an especially interesting series of 

Secretary activities. The "Mock-Olympic Games Meet" proved to 

be a very successful get-together. The Lutheran Students 





H ARVEY B-AJEH 


Ccauncs Awmo* 


SeIMA AnDIUOM 


Evelyn- Aot i 


Bnt»> **ot BeouHN 


Edward Briuir 


Ruth Bumck 


Edward Bressur 


RoiAMOND CaRUOK 


Piri»C««IITIAI«10M 


Betty Cmrutotmbmos 


Hartvici Dotieth 


Oka* Emsutwk 


DoROTMT Porbkau 


Erwim Hawon 


Acnes Head 


Erma Hirwic 


Georci Ht*ior 



\ 



<74r 



THE TOWER 1934 



made many staunch friendships through their Old- 
Fashioned Halloween Party, Twelfth Night meeting, 
and Treasure Hunt— and perhaps foremost of all, the 
sleigh ride. Educational meetings as well as social ac- 
tivities were included in the year's calendar. 



Betty Christopherson 
Mr. Grinnell 
Miss Froggatt 



Officers: 



Treasurer 
Adviser 
Adviser 




fW„M*.T,«OK JohmKW CtAD„M«««n^ Hcch^t Metro Cowhua Mooot 

HRMOww MAMotWTi Roftrot. Eo*.KSrr« T M«oaw*omw« Ea« fam 



Uowaro Luwotu. 

WllUAM OUON 
MaKLCTTA Zichm 



( 



{75} 



I 




THE TOWER 1934 



Officers: 



Albert Feirer 
June Trastek 
Dorothy Strkse 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 



MANUAL ARTS PLAYERS 

' - - ' The Manual Arts Players organization is composed 
of a group of students interested in dramatics as a worth' 
while extra-curricular activity to pursue in one's leisure 
time. 

The plays presented by the club this year were: 
Nothing But The Truth, a three-act comedy by James 
Montgomery — this comedy was the Homecoming play; 
One Night in Bethlehem, a play of the Nativity, by 
Katharine S. Brown and Glenna Smith Tinnin — this 
play was given during the Christmas season; The Im- 





Stuart Anderson 


Ruth Bubeck 


Albert Feirer 


John Feirer 


Wayne Gripfin 


Charles Harmon- 


Henry Harmon- 


Lawrence Hoyt 


Versa Jbobn 


Sophie Jeatran- 


Verne Jewett 


Olive Hylland 



) 



\ 



{76} 



THE TOWER 1934 



portance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde — this drama 
was offered as the Spring production. Several one-act 
plays were given for club meetings and for the student 
assembly. 

For social recreation, the club gave two very inter- 
esting dinner dances for its members and their guests. 

Although dramatics at The Stout Institute is only 
and extra-curricular activity, the club has done some 
commendable work. The student body looks forward 
with real pleasure to the Manual Arts plays. 



Officers: 



Stuart Anderson 
Miss Hassler 
Mr. Grinnell 



Treasurer 
Director 

Adviser 




Virginia Kutu Ben Lohrie Clarence McClellan Gladys Mikkelson 

Patrick O'Connor Dorothy Omsteo Helen Owen Everett Ostrum 

Harold Stroiinskv Jl-ne Trastk Robert Whaley Lawrence Wolske 



/ 



{77} 



/ 



THE TOWER 1934 



Officers: 

Mildred Nickel President 

Virginia Ray Secretary 

Inez Nienow Treasurer 

Mrs. Houston Adviser 



PHI UPSILON OMICRON 

- - ' Phi Upsilon Omicron is a National Honorary Home 
Economics Fraternity for Junior and Senior women. 
The Tau chapter was installed in The Stout Institute 
in 1932. It is an active organization, having a definitely 
planned yearly program. Several meetings are devoted to 
professional study and betterment. The sale of fruit 
cakes has become a very popular annual project. Each 
year the fraternity gives a fifty dollar scholarship to a 
Freshman girl. This year it will send a delegate to the 
National Conclave in June, in Columbus, Ohio. 




I 

■«flfr 

. r 



\ 



Mrs. Houston 
Ruth Bosselmas 
Luella Ericsson 
Mildred Nickel 



Miss Michaels 

Doris Bradley 

Rose Forno 

Virginia R\v 



Mlss Wright 
Martha Bcbcck 
Ruth Howbon 
Marion Rhiel 



Mrs. Meslow 

Dorothy Cain 

Louise Lee 

Marly* Richert 



Jean Amidon 

Verna Damm 

Inez Nienow 

Marguerite Roettiger 



> 



{78> 



THE TOWER 1934 



PALLAS ATHENE 

' - - - The Pallas Athene Society was organized by a 
group of girls in January, 1934, for the purpose of pro- 
moting culture, fellowship, and scholarship. 

The name of this social organization has its origin 
in Greek mythology, in the name of the goddess of 
wisdom, science, and the arts. 

The new society was formed in response to an in- 
creasingly felt need for a fourth women's social or- 
ganization. 

Business, cultural, and social meetings are held each 
month. 



Officers: 



LUELLA ErICKSON 

Inez Pickering 
Dorothy Lloyd 
Viola Larson- 
Miss Lusby - 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Adviser 




Miss Li/shv 


Dorothv Baun 


Rosamond Carlson 


Ll-ella Ericsson 


Acnes Hed 


Irma Her wig 


Merle Hill 


Viola Larson 


Ink Pickering 


Esther Spauldinc 


Acnes &THMU 


Elaine Thomas 



<79> 



/ 




THE TOWER 1934 



Officers: 



June Very - 
Dagney Andreassen 
Dorothy Boody - 
Miss Buchanan - 



President 

ViccPrcsidaxt 

Treasurer 

Adviser 



AREME 

- - - - The Areme Society is composed of women who 
are members of the Order of the Eastern Star, or who 
are daughters of Star members or of Masons. 

At Christmas time, Areme gave surprise baskets 
and Christmas trees to a number of the needy families 
of Menomonie. Social activities with former DeMolays 
were especially successful this year, as was the Areme 
dinner-dance held at Cafe La Corte. 








Mi» Buchanan 


Evelyn Ade< 


Dorothy Bodoy 


Rosamond Carlson 


Jean Good 






Jane Green 


Janice Henninc 


Marion Herpst 


Eunice Hockenbrock 


Doris Jeitery 


1 


>\ 


Marjory Leonard 


Marie Murray 


Marlys Richert 


Florence Ruesink 


June Very 


r'.ul 


f 


1 











f 



<80> 



- - 



THE TOWER 1934 



PEGASUS CLUB 

' - - - Pegasus Club is an organization of students who 
are actively interested in literature, and whose academic 
rating in the English department warrants their in- 
clusion as members. 

Meetings were held bi-weekly; members or guest 
speakers presented programs based on the life and works 
of various writers. In March, the Pegasus members 
were hostesses at a tea in the Women's Social Room. 



Officers: 



Louise Lee - 
Mary Swiston 
Rose For no 
Miss Callahan 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Adiiser 




Mt» Callahan 

Rose For no 
Grace Johnson 



Rlth Bosselman 

Rlth Graham 

Loutse Lee 



Bernr Christopherson- 
Emman Herman- 
Mary S*tston 



VERNA Da 

Eunice Hockenbroch 
June Trastex 



( 



<81> 



/ 




THE TOWER 1934 



Officers: 
Eugene Doyle - - President 

KarlLohr * Vice-President 

Richard Dixon Secretary 

Carl Haase Treasurer 

Mr. Baker Adviser 



STOUT TYPOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY 

- - - - Membership in the Stout Typographical Society 
is divided into three degrees, recognizing the student's 
progress in the acquisition of information and in ex- 
perience in the field of printing. 

Regular meetings were held twice a month to discuss 
different problems in printing. The S.T.S. "Get To- 
gether," the Homecoming Banquet, and participation 
in intramural sports were the activities of the year. 




M» Bah* Ei>»a»d B>wi» 

Cnnm Hyuamd H*m KOTAUB 




\ 



Bnmi BtctMK 


RtcttK CAtr 


ElCIKt Doth 


Carl Ha am 


Gtotct Hnior 


Rot Lauos 


Kahl Loh* 


Lbti» PfHl 


Harlow Roati 


Forkkt Sum 


Ea»i Smith 


Aim Skimcm 


Bordis $TMV f 


EkUtfC SvtMtON 


LtOTD WlUON 



\ 



<82> 



THE TOWER 1934 



EPSILON PI TAU 

- - - - Epsilon Pi Tau is an honorary Industrial Edu- 
cation Fraternity for Junior and Senior men. During 
the present year the group studied problems of com- 
temporary industrial education. Epsilon Pi Tau con- 
tributed to the preparation of The National Review 
and sent President Nelson and Dean Bowman as dele- 
gates to the National Convention in Detroit, Michigan. 



Officers: 



Elbert Barnhart 


President 


Roy Larson ' 


Vice-President 


Harland Wood worth 


Secretary-Treasurer 








Mr. Bowman 


Elbert Barnhart 


Ralph Betterley 


Mr. Brown- 


El'cene Doyle 


Paul Doyle 


Norman Jem 


Robert Jensen 


Bverh Nbmm 


Charles Peterson 


Mr. Price 


Harland Woodworth 



/ 

/ 



<83 r 






THE TOWER 1934 



Officers: 



Marian Rhiel 
Ramona Klatt ' 
Sylvia Worthincton 
Elaine Thomas - 
Miss Cruise 
Miss Walsh 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Adviser 

Adviser 



HOME ECONOMICS CLUB 

' - - - The Home Economics Club is a social discussion 
group which includes all the women entered in the 
school of Home Economics. During the past year the 
programs included interesting talks by Miss Mildred 
Drescher, Mr. David Mackaye, Mrs. Carlisle Shafer; 
reports of the National Home Economics Convention; 
group discussions of the outlook for graduates in Home 
Economics and of the practicality of the modern ward- 
robe; a Christmas tea; and a farewell to the Seniors. 








Miss Cruise 


Mi» Walsh 


Marion Rhkl 


Ramona Klatt 






Sylvia Worthincton 


Elaine Thomas 


Marguerite Roetticer 


JUNF TRASTEK 


1 

■fm 


m 


1 








(I' 




I 









\ 



<84> 



THE TOWER 1934 



METALLURGY CLUB 

The purpose of the Metallurgy Club is to bring 
together a group of men interested in further development 
in metal working. At meetings during the year the 
members study characteristics and properties of various 
metallic earths, the various uses of metals, and the pro- 
cesses of manufacturing metallic products. 

The men displayed fine sportsmanship this year 
during intramural season, and the club's Spring Formal 
was a marked success. 



Officers: 
Clarence McClellan - 
Joe Trinko - 
Erhart Carlson - 
James K noble 
Mr. Milnes 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Adviser 




Mr. Muses 


Robert Brierlet 


Erhart Carlson 


Hartvtck Dotseth 


John Feirer 


Jim Covin 


Willard Hicks 


Woodrus Hor man- 


Lawrence Kaisfr 


James Knohlf 


Rcssel May 


Clarence McCceilan 


John Radke 


Frank Ruppe 


Edwin Seifert 



A 



i 



485} 



( 



/ 



THE TOWER 1934 



Officers: 



Viola Larson 
luella erickson ' 
Mary Louise Nibbe 
Versa Jesses 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 



Y. W. C. A. 

'"Any girl can be good looking" has been the 
slogan of the Charm School promoted by the Y. W. C. 
A. this year. Since charm was not the only problem of 
the Freshman girl, the Y. W. delegated Big Sisters to 
acquaint the Little Sisters with their new environment; 
and, in co-operation with the Y. M. C. A., introduced 
them to the fun of the college at the all-school picnic 
in the fall. 

In addition to this orientation of new students, the 
Y. W. C. A. carried on social service work in the com 
munity, and provided the annual Christmas tree and 
carolling in the Home Economics corridor. 





Miss McCalmont 

Marion Cham 
Gladys Mikkleson 



Miss Leedom 

LUELLA ExiCKSON 

Mary Louise Nibbf 



Miss Wricht 
Ruth Graham 
Inez Pickering 



Mbs Verrel 
Verna Jensen 
Sylv:a Wort his 



Miss Carson- 
Viola Larson 



\ 



<86> 



THE TOWER 1934 



Y. M. C. A. 

Co-operative work and individual betterment 
are basic aims of the Y. M. C. A. This year The Stout 
Institute Y. M. C. A. divided its meetings into three 
groups. The social meetings fostered good fellowship 
through intramural sports, skiting, tobogganing, hiking, 
and skiing parties; the discussion groups promoted the 
ideals of student citizenship and worthy scholastic 
achievement; the meetings at which outside speakers 
lectured provided an educational as well as a recre- 
ational source of enjoyment. 

Stunt Night, always sponsored by the Y members, 
was more successful than ever — under the new plan 
of presentation. 



Officers: 



WlLLARD HlCKS 

Norman Jensen 
Harvey Nourse 
Harold Sack 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 




Top row— H. Martinson; E. Barnhart; H. Olson; F. Ruffe; C. Haasc; O. Embretson; H. Jensen; H. Moltsau. 
Second row — J. McLeod; A. Barbo; J. Johnston; F. Duda; W. Houc; H. Dotseth. 

Third tow—Mk. Dawut; A. Baier; H. Nourse; E. Ebert; C. Brenner; H. Sack; V. Myrick; Mr. Robinson. 
Bottom row- P Christianson; E. Hanson; R. Brierly; L. Oass; W. Hicks; R. Purceu; R. May; H. Kubalk. 



( 



<87> 






THE TOWER 1934 



Officers: 
Frank Ruppe - President 

Mary Swbton ' * » Secretary-Treasurer 

Father Jeuck Adviser 

Mr. Hanson Adviser 



MARQUETTE-LA SALLE 

' - - - Marquette-LaSalle is an organization for all 
Catholic students and teachers in the college. It is a 
link between them and their church. 

Every month the group enjoys a Communion Break- 
fast in an atmosphere of congeniality and good fellow- 
ship. Not only does the organization provide desirable 
social contacts for its members, but it also is a source of 
educational improvement and individual betterment. 





Top row- K. Price; R. Murray; C. Harmon; S. Giovannis!; F. Rirm; F. Duda. 

Second rour-G. O'Connell; M. Price; L. Wilson; L. Styer; Mr. Hanson; D. Flick; O. Laurich. 

Botton row — M. Swbton; H. Harmon; P. Hanson; Father Jeuck; M. Erpenhach: M. Beelen; A. Scheneckner. 



'88> 



THE TOWER 1934 



THE SCIENCE CLUB 

- - - - The Science Club is composed of the students 
.and faculty members who are especially interested in 
the progress of science. In the weekly meetings during 
the past year recent scientific discoveries and research 
were discussed. Each of the individuals who participated 
in the work of the club acquired much information. 



Officers: 



Ruth Bosselman 
Gladys Ingall 
Emma Herman- 
Miss Cruise 
Miss Bachmann 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Adviser 

Adviser 




Top tow—E. Christophnuon; R. BossriMAN; I. Nienow; G. Mikmlson; L. Storandt; V. Davis; R. Howison. 
Bottom rour—G. Lotwin; R Forno; V. Damm; L. Dauw; J. Hrs- ;v . A Stein-kit; E. Spalding; E Herman. 



( ., 



<89r 



/ 



THE TOWER 1934 



Officers: 



Ralph Betterley - 
Russell May 
Charles Arnoldt 
Bernhardt Beguhn 
Mr. Ingraham 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Librarian 

Director 



THE STOUT INSTITUTE BAND 

- - - - Membership in The Stout Institute Band, or- 
ganized in 1922 for the fostering of training in 
instrumental music, is open to all students. 

Beginning with the chartering of a bus for the La 
Crosse football game, the band has aided in promoting 
pep at all the athletic competitions this year. In May, 
it presented concerts in Wilson Park and in several 
neighboring towns. 

On November 17th, a dinner dance was given at 
Cafe La Corte by the band and the Stout Enharmonic 
Orchestra. 





First tow A. Scheetner; W. Horman; B. Lohrie; H. Hlher; W. Hour.. 

Second row—B. Becchn; A. Mjchna; C. Arnoldt; H. Hendrickjon; E. Bolle; V. Jewett. 

Third tow I. Brown; M. Sjolander; E. Ades; S. Giovanni*!; P. Lalrmann; F. Becker; M. Joo«. 

Fourth tow— W. Gurrw; R. Whaley; R. May; Mr. Inc.ramam; R. Bftterley; O. Emhretson; A. Soum 



\ 



\90} 



THE TOWER 1934 



THE STOUT INSTITUTE 
ENHARMONIC ORCHESTRA 

- - - - The Stout Enharmonic Orchestra, organized in 
1929 with an initial membership of fourteen, has in- 
creased in size to twenty members, chosen by try-outs 
at the beginning of each semester. 

The orchestra played for M.A.P. productions during 
the year, and presented a concert in assembly. On 
November 17th, the orchestra and band gave a joint 
dinner-dance at Cafe La Corte. 



Officers: 



Ralph Betterley 
Adelaide Larson- 
Mary Finney 
Dr. Harrington 
Mr. Grobe - 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Pianist 

Director 




Top row— R. Betterley; R. Whaley; H. Hlber; A. Scheetner; W. Horman; E. Bcmxe. 

Bottom row— W. Gurm; A. Larson; M. Schl-lts; M. Finney; Mr. Grobe. director; F. Ruenoc; F. Becker; K. Price. 



( 



•191 > 



/ 




THE TOWER 1934 



Officers: 



Robert Chamberlin 
Frederick Curran 
Ben Lohrie * 
Ray Burgett 
Mrs. Mitchell 
Mr. Good - 



President 

ViccPrcsident 

Treasurer 

Business Manager 

Accompanist 

Director 



MEN'S GLEE CLUB 

- - - - The Men's Glee Club, organized in 1920 for the 
development of musical talent and poise, has twenty 
members chosen at the beginning of each year by com- 
petitive tryouts. 

A concert tour of western Wisconsin cities and 
colleges; the presentation of classical and popular pro- 
grams over radio station W.T.A.Q., Eau Claire, Wis- 
consin; and the staging of an operetta were the major 
activities of the year. The season closed with the annual 
dinner-dance. 





Top row — W". Rowe; S. Anderson; J. Milnes; H. Huber; R. Whaley; E. Hucdahl; J. Einum. 

Second row — R. Betterley; G. Chamberlin; H. Keller; L. Hoyt; T. Pierson; R. BcRcrrr; D. Snoyenbos. 

Bottom row — R. Grecc; C. Johnson; Mrs. R. W. Mitchell, accompanist: Mr. Good, dtrcaor: F. Curran; R. Chamherlin; A Feirer. 



\ 

) 



\ 



{92} 



THE TOWER 1934 



WOMEN'S GLEE CLUB 

' ' - - The members of the Women's Glee Club are • 
interested in the study of various types of classical and 
popular music. Each year the club gives a home concert 
and an assembly program. In addition, this year the 
club made a tour of several Wisconsin cities, and, in 
co-operation with the Men's Glee Club, assisted the 
M. A. P.'s in the production of the Christmas play. 
In January, the group entertained the Home Economics 
students at a tea; in March, the members were hostesses 
at the annual formal dinner-dance. 



Officers: 
Mary Louise Nibbe 
Irma Miller 
Dorothy Davison 
Elizabeth Christopherson 
Mary Lou Funk - 
Miss Reynolds 



President 

Treasurer 

Librarian 

Business Manager 

Accompanist 

Director 




Top row—F. Rubsink; M. Nibbe; V. Guns; M. Murray; D. Epstein; J. Shaper; E. Anderson; E. Flanagan; A. Overbeck. 
Second row — M. Schuitz; M. Finney; I. Miller; D. Davison; D. Gardner; M. Sjolander; L. Fleming; E. Christopherson; H. Boody. 
Bottom row—D. Jepprey ; M. Malcolm; V. Nutter; Miss Reynolds, director; M. Fitnk. accompanist H. Good; J. Martin; M. Curran. 



<93> 



( 




THE TOWER 1934 



Officers: 



Clifford Bjornson 
George Stewart 
Margaret Kline 
Bernie Peterson - 
Mr. Dockar 



President 

Executive Officer 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Adviser 



THE STOUT RIFLE CLUB 

- - • - The Stout Rifle Club is affiliated with the National 
Rifle Association. Organized for the promotion of rifle 
practice and the development of marksmanship, the 
Rifle Club promoted individual and team contests 
within the club and competed with outside rifle teams 
in postal and shoulder-to-shoulder matches this year. 
The organization joined the Metallurgy Club in spon- 
soring a dinner-dance on March 17th. 




Top row — C. Bjornson; C. Haase; E. Bressler; W. Pierson; H. Kubalek; E. Hanson. 

Second row -G. Stewart; B. Peterson; Mr. Dockar; H. Nours«; R. Singer. 

Bottom row — A. McDonald; J. Shaper; M. Colter; K. Rice; D. Fordham; M. Schulti. 






. f 



> 



494, 



THE TOWER 1934 



LYNWOOD HALL 

■ ■ • ■ Although the number of men living in Lynwood 
is much smaller this year than ever before, the activities 
of the group have in no way been lessened. In keeping 
with the annual custom, the men entertained the college 
faculty members at a Sunday afternoon tea. 

Twice during the year they turned "the perfect hosts," 
even the "rowdy second floor gang" and invited their 
best girls to Open-House — an evening of cards, food, 
music, and dancing. 



Officers: 



Leonard Lundell 
Steve Giovannini 
Verne Jewett 
William Olson 
Mrs. Davison 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

House Mother 



i ,1 U * > 1 1 * 



Top row — S. Giovanni.ni; L. Wallner; H. Olson; E. Ostrom; C. Harmon; L. Hojtettler; R. Buncrrr; H. Roate; R. Murray 
Second row—H. Baier; V. Jewett; W. Olson; D. Thomas; H. Kubalek; E. Hanson; R. Aincer; H. Schulz; F. Duda. 
Bottom row — R. Whauy; C. Romine; R. Roberts; H. Harmon; L. Lundell; J. Dolejs; J. Messano; P. Chrktianson. 









4 95> 



THE TOWER 1934 



A bumping pitch and a blinding light. 
An hour to play and the last man in. 
^ And it's not for the sake of a ribboned coat. 

Or the selfish hope of a season's fame. 
But his Captain's hand on his shoulder smote — 
"Play up! play up! and play the game!" 
\ — Henry Newbolt 





> 4»> 




Athletics 



THE TOWER 1934 



Coach Earl Burbidge has been at the helm 
as coach and athletic director at Stout since 
February, 1931, coming here from two years 
of successful coaching at Antigo High School. 
Burbidge has had an extensive sports pro- 
gram in swing at all times. Although his 
college teams have not been champions, there 
has been a noticeable upswing in athletics. 

One of Coach Burbidge's achievements at 
Stout has been the development of an ex- 
tensive program of intramural activities. 





M 



Head Coach Burbidge 




Assistant Coach Harmon 



Henry Harmon, former Stout backfield 
man. assisted Coach Burbidge this past season 
in coaching the football team. As assistant. 
Hank's attention centered on the develop- 
ment of a strong line, work in which he 
succeeded to a noticeable degree. 

Having played three years of stellar foot- 
ball with the Blue Devils. Hank's ability and 
lighting spirit contributed much to the success 
of Burbidge's squad during the past season, 
for the team felt keenly his persistent, never- 
say-die Spi 



I 



<99> 










THE TOWER 1934 



The athletic department selects students 
to take charge of the athletic equipment 
Usually two men are selected, each one 
having a single sport assigned to his manage- 
ment. This year the burden of both football 
and basketball was carried by one student, 
Franklin Duda. 

Managers receive practical experience in 
bandaging, in taping, and in the care of 
equipment. After two years of service they 
are awarded a sweater and a letter. 




Manager Duda 



THE CHEER LEADERS 

Each year the cheer leaders are elected on a competitive try-out basis by the school assembly. Try-outs are held 
in the college auditorium in the fall. 

This year, Forrest Sissel was elected head leader: his two assistants were Margaret Sjolander and Shorty Beach. 
Beach has been cheer leader during the past two years, while Sjolander and Sissel are new leaders this season. 

Our hats are off to the trio for their cooperative work in promoting school spirit. Sissel's drive on La Crosse 
easily compared to Sherman's march to the sea. 

At the end of two years of service, letters are awarded. Sissel and Beach will receive their "S" in 1934. 





Forrest Sissel 



Margaret Sjolander 



Harry Beach 






4100} 



THE TOWER 1934 



Sue. the fleet-footed halfback, was a great 
asset to the Blue Devils' machine this past 
season. He played a cool, consistent type 
of ball, gaining considerable yardage for 
Stout. Running behind inteference was 
Sue's specialty, as was shown in the La 
Crosse game in which he made several long 
runs behind good blocking. 





Captain Nelson 




Co-captain Gaertner 



Two men, Hylland of Menomonie, and 
Gaertner, the flash from Neenah, served as 
co-captains. Hylland was a three-year letter 
man; during the past year he placed third in 
the individual scoring race in the state con- 
ference. 

Gaertner was outstanding in defense, ball 
advancement, and the starting of plays. He 
has one year in which to play for the Blue 
and White. 







■1101 } 



r 



THE TOWER 1934 



INTRAMURAL SPORTS 

The object of intramural sports is to provide opportunity in athletics for those not possessing 
enough ability to meet college competition in the two main activities of the year. "Sports for Everyone" 
is the motto of this yearly program. 

During this year the Stout intramural program consisted of twenty-four sports and activities 
with competition at its keenest. The activities have been divided into major and minor divisions 
with basketball, volley ball, ping pong, indoor relays, free throwing, horseshoes, tennis, golf, touch 
football, water polo, and swimming in the major sports division. Chess, bridge, 6ve hundred, 
billiards, pool, checkers, and cribbage were classed under the minor sports classifications. 

The teams were rated by a point system. Each team, both major and minor, received fifty points 
for entry in each event. In the major division first place received five hundred points, second three 
hundred, and third one hundred. In the minor division each first place received two hundred and 
fifty points, second one hundred and fifty, and third fifty. 

Organizations providing competition this year were: K. F. S., F. O. B., Y. M. C. A., Metallurgy, and 
Lynwood. Competition was strong between the Y. M. C. A., K. F. S.. and F. O. B.; the closing 
events will determine the winner of the 1934 Intramural trophy. 

INTRAMURAL RESULTS 



Basketball 



Volley Ball 



Free Throws 



18 



\ 









W 


L 








W 


L 


F.O. B. - 




- 


7 


1 


F.O. B. - 


- 


* 


8 





Y. M. C. A. 




- 


4 


4 


Metallurgy 


* 


' 


5 


3 


K. F. S. . 




«■ 


3 


5 


Lynwood 


* 


' 


4 


4 


Lynwood 




' 


3 


5 


K.F.S. ' 


* 


' 


2 


6 


Metallurgy 




' 


3 


5 


Y. M. C. A. 


* 


■ 


1 


7 


Chess 








Ping 


Pong 












W 


L 








W 


L 


F. O. B. - 


* 


- 


4 





Y. M. C. A. 





- 


4 





K. F. S. * 


* 


> 


3 


1 


K. F. S. ' 


* 


* 


3 


1 


Y. M. C. A. 


« 


* 


2 


2 


Lynwood 


* 


' 


2 


2 


Metallurgy 


' 


> 


1 


3 


F. O. B. • 


- 


* 


1 


3 


Lynwood 


' 


' 





4 


Metallurgy 


- 


* 





4 


Billiards 








Bridge 












W 


L 








W 


L 


F. O. B. - 


* 


■ 


2 





F. O. B. - 


+ 


* 


2 


1 


Metallurgy 


• 


* 


1 


1 


Lynwood 


+ 


- 


1 





Y. M. C. A. 


' 


* 


1 


2 


K. F. S. - 


- 


> 





1 


K. F.S. < 


* 


* 





1 
Bowling 


Y. M. C. A. 
W L 









1 




K. 


F. 


S. 


< 


14 4 






Y.M 


.C. A. 




F. 


O. 


B. 


- 


13 5 






K. F. S. 




Y. 


M 


C. A 


■ 


5 13 






Metallurgy 




Metallurgy 


• 


1 17 






Lynwood 












Point 


St 


anding 














F. O. B. 




■ 


3325 












Y. M. C. A. 




* 


2725 












K. F. S. * 




- 


2368 












Metallurgy 




- 


1333 












Lynwood - 




- 


733 



F. O. B. . 

K. F. S. 

Y. M. C. A. 

Metallurgy * 
Lynwood 



Pool 



Y. M. C. A. 
K. F. S. - 
Metallurgy 
F. O. B. * 



Cribbage 



F. O. B. - 
K. F. S. * 
Y. M. C. A. 
Metallurgy 

Swimming 



25 

14 
6 

1 



258 
238 
199 
172 
160 



W L 

2 1 

1 

1 

1 



W 

3 

2 
1 



>r 



002} 



THE TOWER 1934 



CONFERENCE STANDING 

NORTHERN DIVISION 

W L T T. P. 

River Falls 2 1 1 20 

La Crosse 2 1 l 54 

Superior 2 1 25 

St ° ut ' 2 2 41 

Eau Claire '0 3 19 

SOUTHERN DIVISION 

W L T T. P. 

Stevens Point 3 1 62 

Milwaukee 3 1 q 55 

Oshkosh ' 2 1 1 57 

Whitewater ...... \ 3 q jj 

Platteville '0 4 6 



O. P. PCT. 



13 


.667 


26 


.667 


15 


.667 


53 


.500 


53 


.(XX) 



O. P. PCT. 



20 


1.000 


21 


.750 


14 


.667 


25 


.250 


110 


.000 




Top rour-W. Braker; L. Puhl; H. Strozixskv; J Doujs; E. Bkrman; G. Decker; D. WttllAm; C Brenner 

s~* ^ A-^coACH J2ss^^SSS^^?KiSiJ?- Zastrow: h IWms p 0XW! r Purce - w B — ' > 

Bottom rou- C Hviland; C. Harmon; G. Vfnnfs; C Behrinc.er; C. Rowr; H. Jack; H. Wooowortm; F. Rum; H Gawtoi r. 



/ 






•i!03> 



r 




The first 
game of the 
1933 football 
season was a 
prcconference 
battle on the local 
gridiron against 
Winona Teachers 
College. The margin 
of victory for Stout 
was the result of a punt 
blocked by Behringer, 
guard, on the Winona 
twenty yard line, and the 
ball was grounded by Gaer tner , 
left end. behind the goal line 
for the lone touchdown of the 
game. The game was a typical 
early-season tussle, marked by 
numerous fumbles and penalties. 
The Blue Devils showed a strong de- 
fense by halting several drives of the 
Peds. The punting of Rogge for Winona 
and the ball carrying of Sue Nelson were 
the main features of the game. 
STOUT ' . . . 6 

WINONA TEACHERS - - 




STOUT 

ST. MARY'S - 

The second non-conference game 
the season found the Burbidgei 
playing a night game with St. Ma 
Winona. Stout held the « 
throughout most of the game 
threatened to score near the 
of the first half when Hu 
Woodworth intercepted a 
Mary's pass on his c 
twenty-five yard line 
dashed seventy yards 
the opponent's five 5 
stripe. The half en 
and prevented Si 
from scoring, h 
lock's leading a 
cessful drive 
Winona in 
second half 
ted St. Ma 
a touchd( 
and vict 
7-0. 



Zastrow 




STOUT 

RIVER FALLS 13 

A scrappy Stout eleven lost its first con- 
ference game of the season to the River 
Falls Falcons on Romer field. The 
Burbidgemen had the edge through- 
out the first quarter; but the 
Falcons started a drive and Brick 
ner. Falls fullback, pushed over 
for six points. Stout retaliated. 
Passes from Beckman to Stori 
and Nelson scored a touch- 
down to make the game six 
all at the half. In the 
second half the aggres- 
sive Falcons launched 
another drive which 
gave them seven 
more points, 

to make the 
score 13-6. 
Stori's punting 
featured the 
play of the 
Blue Dev- 
ils. 



Thes 

Yell. 

jacket 

^ sion fronr 

north 

halted by ; 

termined i 

Devil eleven 

the local grid 

Stout's running 

ftack functioned ir 
first quarter w 
_A Wood worth. Nelson, 

Tarz Braker drove the 
skin to the one yard 
where it was lost on do 
A safety was given to S 
when Avis stepped from 
end zone to punt. Stout sc 
L^^ in the first quarter when Hyl 

^^> recovered a fumble on the Sup< 
* six yard line. In two off-ta 

smashes, Tarz carrying the ball, S 
scored. The Yellowjackets scored in 
last period and made the score: Stoi 
Superior 6. O'Connor played a strong 
fensive game in the center of the line for St 

STOUT 

SUPERIOR 



Jacm 





The Blue 
Devils' 
aerial attack 
in the home' 
coming game 
drubbed the 
Zornmen 2013. 
After two complete 
passes, Eau Claire 
scored. Beckman, 
Decker, and Nelson car- 
ried the ball to the Peds' 
three yard stripe. Nelson 
plunged through the line for a 
score and Decker converted the 
extra point. Two more touch- 
downs were netted by the 
Burbidgemen when Hylland snared 
two passes from Beckman, to score 
each time. Eau Claire's second touch- 
down came in the last quarter after the 
completion of two seventeen yard 
passes. Stori's punting was sensational. 
Ruppe, Harmon, and Rowe played well 
in the line. 
STOUT 
EAU CLAIRE 



Capt. Nelson - 


Ha 


Woodworth - 


Ha 


Peterson 


Ha 


Bogaard 


Ha 


Beckman - 


■ Quant 


^ Purcell ' 


• Quartc 


^k Decker 


Fu 


A Braker 


Fu 


^ Gaertner - 


• 


Stori 


* * 



Woodworth 



'N 






Stow 




Hylland End 

Puhl End 

Jach Tackle 

Harmon » Tac^k 

Ruppe ' - - Tackle 

Behringer - - Guard 

Dotseth ' - - Guard 
Zastrow - - Guard 

Rowe- - - Guard 

O'Connor - • Center 



fell 
the 
drive 
Maroon 
to give La 
a 21-7 hoi 
ing victory. 
Blue Devils la 
a fast drive in t 
quarter: Beckman 
twenty yards from 
mage and Gaei 
snatched a shovel r. 
dash thirty-five yards 
Redmen's four yard 
On the fourth down I 
penetrated the line for the 
La Crosse tied at seven all 
close of the half. Added strenj 
the Maroons and a weakened 
team gave the Peds two more 
downs in the second half. N 
behind good interference, made 
sensational runs for Stout. Stori, 
Braker, Decker, Gaertner, C. Harmon, 
Hylland, Nelson Rowe, Zastrow, Pun 
Purcell played their last game for 

STOUT 

LACROSSE 



• 





THE TOWER 1934 



Co-captain Hylland 



The score was tied up fourteen all at halftime. The Burbidgemen rallied in tr 
final period, but fell short by one point, losing 27-26. Gaertner and Hyllari 
led the scoring for Stout, while Helenck starred for the *'Y." 

The conference schedule opened with the Devils playing the River Fal 

Falcons here. Competition, rivalry, frequent scoring made this the mo 

exciting game of the season. The Falcons led throughout the final perio 

but were tied and led by Stout in the closing period. Diminutive Geor; 

Chamberlin surprised his larger opponents when he stole scoring hone 

with 17 points. The Falcons, however, surged ahead in the closii 

minutes to win 39-35. H»ckel and Morrow starred for River Fal 

The Burbidgemen retaliated maneuvers by invading the Falcor 

court on January nineteenth. 

In a rough and exciting game the count stood 10 all at t 

> half, but the Cowlesrren came back strong in the last peric 

to win 34-22. Three men were put out on personal fou 

Jach and Braaten of Stout, and McChesney of the Falcoi 




The Blue Devils opened their cage season by invading 
the court of Gustavus Adolphus. Coach Burbidge took 
eight men on the trip and used all of them. The inexperience 
of new material, with short periods of preparation, was clearly 
shown in the defeat the Devils suffered. The Gusties. led by 
Thorne, drove to a 12-5 lead at halftime and ended on the long end 
of a 33-11 count. 

Stout next encountered the Concordia quint on the home floor. 
Burbidge used fourteen men to defeat the St. Paulites. Concordia had 
the edge 17-10 at halftime, but the Devils staged a rally in the last 
half to emerge the victors, 33-27. Hylland starred with 12 points. 

The next non-conference home game found Stout playing Macalester. 
The Devils exhibited good ball in the first half, but succumbed to the Macs' 
drive in the closing period in which Hal Smith led his teammates to a 33-22 
win. G. Chamberlin, Braaten, and Gaertner starred for Stout. 

Thursday, December 21, found the Devils playing their last non -conference 
game with the St. Paul "Y." The game was a nip and tuck affair throughout. 




Doirj* 



*10S> 



THE TOWER 1934 



Morrow, Falls center, scored' 14 points and Hylland scored 10 points. 

In a poor exhibition of basketball Stout lost its third conference game of the 

season to the Eau Claire Peds by a score of 38-37. The Peds trailed the DeviU 

throughout the game, but came back strong to have Bruhn break through 

for the winning basket. Chamberlin and Hylland led the scoring for Stout 

The Yellow Wave from Superior provided the opposition in the next 

conference, game. The Devils" fast breaking offense and zone defense 

completely baffled the Wherottmen m the second half when Stout 

outscored its opponents 14-8. The margin held by Superior in 

the first half was, however, enough to give them a win, 3026. 

February 9, found the Devils in the North, invading the Yellow 

Jackets on their own floor. The Burbidgemen were again unable 

to "click"* and the Peds took the count over Stout. 26-10. The 

Blue Devils were on the short end of a 14-8 score at the end of the 

half. Braaten and Gaertner played stellar ball for Stout. 







Dfckfr 



Led by Bill Schwoegler, the Racquet cagers from La Crosse 
scored an easy victory over Stout. The Burbidgemen started 
the scoring with two goals and a gift shot, but Coach Johnson's 
boys soon found themselves and led at the half, 25-15. La Crosse 
scored consistently in the last half to lead at the end. 51-29. Hylland 
Braaten. and Jach played best for Stout. 
On February twenty-third Coach Burbidge led his men against 
Uoach Zorn s quint in an attempt to win a conference game The 
Devils were not clicking; Eau Claire led 20-15 at the half. Led by Kattke 
and Voight the Zornmen pushed through to be on the long end of a 36-28 
score. Dolejs played a good game at center for Stout. 
To end the conference season the Blue Devils drove to La Crosse where they 
received their worst beating of the year. Schwoegler and Corsten, of the Racquet, 
went on a scoring rampage to send the Racquets'score to 65. Hylland and Gaertner 
aided materially in making Stout's score 30. Having completed their three years of 
college competition, Huck Decker, guard, and Chet Hylland. forward, played their 
last game. 



<109> 



THE TOWER 1934 



NORTHERN DIVISION 

W L T.P. O.P. PCT. 



CONFERENCE STANDING 

ALL-CONFERENCE TEAMS 



Superior * 
La Crosse 
River Falls 
Eau Claire 
Stout 



Milwaukee 
Oshkosh 
Stevens Point 
Whitewater 
Platteville 



<• <» 


7 


1 


279 


198 


.875 


Heckel 





6 


2 


300 


219 


.750 


SCHWOEGLER 


j j 


5 


3 


267 


256 


.625 


Hougen 


* 


2 


6 


244 


313 


.250 


COLLENS 








8 


217 


319 


.000 


HOWATH 


SOUTHERN DIVISION 










W 


L 


T.P. 


O.P. 


PCT. 





7 1 309 

5 3 233 

4 4 228 

3 5 236 

1 7 216 



235 
240 
225 
248 
280 



.875 
.625 
.500 
.375 
.125 



Hylland 

SCHULTX 

Carsten 

Anderson 

Kottke 



FIRST TEAM 
River Falls 
La Crosse 
Superior 
Superior 
La Crosse 



SECOND TEAM 
Stout - 
Superior 
La Crosse 
River Falls - 
Eau Claire 



Forward 

Forward 

Center 

Guard 

Guard 



Forward 

Forward 

Center 

Guard 

Guard 





Top row— Coach Bumidgp ; L. Erpenbach; H. Jach; J. Dolejs; G. Decker; Manacer Duda. 
Bottom row— C. Peterson; H. Ga^tm*. C Hylland; G.Chamberlin; L Braaten 



) 



\ 



4iio> 



THE TOWER 1934 




Bernice Reynolds, 

Director of Physical Education 
for Women 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR WOMEN 



'T'hp department of Physical Education for women aims to build 
■*• up in each student sufficient strength and vitality to meet the 
demands of a normally active life; to encourage an appreciation and 
maintenance of fundamental health habits; to develop skill and 
permanent interest in wholesome recreational activities; and to help 
each girl to adapt herself efficiently and happily to the demands made 
upon her by modern liie. 

The department is continually being improved to meet the changing 
times and new recreational activities being offered in a modern pro. 
gram of physical education. New sports, games, and necessary 
equipment are being added constantly to present a varied list from 
which to choose something of recreational interest to each girl. 
Field hockey, archery, shuffleboard, and deck tennis have been added 
recently for use in class, and for leisure time during the day. Clogging 
character, natural and folk dancing, basketball, volley ball, and Danish 
gymnastic exercises are offered as a part of the winter season program. 

In most cases a girl is allowed to choose which class she wishes 
to enter for her Physical Education requirement. A restricted pre 
gram is offered for girls whom physical disabilities keep from partici' 



nation in alt activities; thus they are given an opportunity to pass 
their requirement in the course and to develop a recreational interest. 

During the second semester of this year an extensive program 
was organized which involved class work in correctives and individual 
case work. Special attention will be given to students having un- 
desirable posture, to those having foot trouble, as well as to girls 
whose general health is below normal. 

The intra -mural activities are sponsored, organized, and conducted 
by the sports managers of the Women's Athletic Association. "Play 
for play's sake," is their motto. Participation in all intramural 
activities is open to all women students of the college whether or 
not they are members of the association. The sports especially 
featured by individual and team competition are: field hockey, volley 
ball, basketball, archery, bowling, tennis, swimming, and shuffleboard. 
Each year the organization sponsors pep dances preceding varsity 
basketball games, a posture contest for women, and a general "splash" 
night for both men and women students 

Bcanicr A. Reynolds 






4111 r 




wn 



1 



THE TOWER 1934 



Officers 



Jean Amidon 
Esther Spaulding 



W. A. A. 

President ■ ■ ■ ■ The Women's Athletic Association is an organi' 

ViecPresident nation of girls who have won seventy-five or more points 

for participation in athletic activities. It affords the 
women students an opportunity for general recreation 
and sponsors various sports in order to promote interest 
in inter <:lass competition. 




Jean Amidon 


Dorothy Bavs 


Orvftta Brakpr 


M.'RCEDA BraU'N 


Martha Blbeck 


Rlth Bubeck 


Dorothy Darling 


Mary F:> 


Rose For so 


Bernadine Gorr 


Rith Graham 


Marguerite Hank wits 



ff 



. f 



> 



ini} 



THE TOWER 1934 



The planned competition of the past year included: 
English field hockey, volley ball, bowling, basketball, 
and archery. The tennis tournament, the swimming 
meet, and Play Day were the features of the W. A. A. 
program. In April, the association held the annual 
banquet at which the awards to members who had 
attained the required high point record were presented. 



Rose For no - 
Inez Pickering 
Miss Reynolds 



Secretary 

Treasurer 

Adviser 




Marion Herpst 


Ruth Howbon 


Dorothy Howison 


Ha* M 


Louise Owen 


Mary Louise Nibpe 


Racna Mullen- 




Edith Swan- 


Elaine Thomas 


Dorothy Strm> 


Marine Schultt 



OI31 




THE TOWER 1934 




EXECUTIVE BOARD OF WOMEN'S ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

Top row B Reynold*, director; E. Swan, hockey, R. BuMCfc, publicity; I Pickering, treasurer; M. Finney, swimming; M- Braun, hiking- 

M. Hankwitz, tennis. 
Btrttom HMD L. Owr.N, basketball; G. Lotwin, social chairman; J Coir, archery; B Gokb, archery; J. Amu>on. President; D. Darlinc:. 
volley ball; R. Forno. secretary; E. SpAutnrM;. vice president. 




R ( Iokf, manager 



J.COLE 



ARCHERY CLUB 

M. Brown 



M. Hanson 



R Graham 




RED CROSS LIFE SAVING CLASS 

Top row — B. Reynolds, director; M. Hanson; D. Baltn; M. Finnky; |. Shaper; N. Burnham. 
Bottom row M. L. Nibhe; M Malcolm; S. Worthinhton; O Brake*. E. Swan. 



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<H4> 



THE TOWER 1934 




SOPHOMORE HOCKEY TEAM 

|*of) row— B. Reynold*, director; D. Baun; A. Schernecker; D. Howison; L. Hanson; M. Haskwitz; E. Swan, manager. 
Bottom tow — O. Brakir; M. Schultz, captain; A- Stpin«;f; M BkfknbaCK; L Ow i k 




CHAMPIONSHIP VOLLEY BALL TEAM— Class of '37 

Top row— M. Colts n ; E. Stfiner; D. Lloyd, iptun; 1 1 l >AIU wo, manager. 
m row—M. Joas; K. Rice; E. Hnwn; D. Fordham; J. Fisk. 




FRESHMAN HOCKEY TEAM 

Top row— B. Reynolds, director; M. CoLTrR; K. Rice; L. Zastrow; D. Lloyd; E. Steiner; E. Swan, manager. 
Bottom row — B Gebmart; M. Price; S. Wood; D. Gardner; M. Sjolander, captain; J. Fmke. 



iH5h 



THE TOWER 1934 



\ "The time has come," the Walrus said, 

"To talk of many things: 
Of shoes — and ships .ind sealing'Wax 
Of cabbages — and kings — " 

Lewis Carroll 

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4116} 




Features 



THE TOWER 1934 



HONOR AWARDS 

' - - - Scholarships, known as Eichelberger scholarships, four in number, of one hundred dollars each, 
are given during commencement week to two men and two women. These awards are based upon 
scholarship, personality, promise of success, social attitudes and accomplishments, and value to the 
school. Only those having a certain high scholastic ranking arc given consideration. 

Those receiving the awards in June, 1933. were Martha Bubeck, Verna Damm. Elbert Barnh art. 
and Frederick Curran. 

Inez Pickering received the Philomathean scholarship and Sylvia Worthington the Phi Upsilon 
Omicron scholarship. Both were awarded on the basis of scholarship. 




Elbert Barnhart 
Verna Damm 



Martha Bubeck 
Isr: Pickering 



Frederick Curran 
Sylvia Worthington 



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iU9} 



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THE TOWER 1934 



MID-WINTER BALL 

' - - - On February tenth, surrounded by pine boughs and modernistic snow men, nearly a hundred couples danced 
to the music of Bobby Griggs and his orchestra. An icy plaque, bearing the letters of the S. M. A., Hyperian, and 
Philomathean societies, the joint sponsors of the party, hung at the end of the hall. 

The members and advisers of Pallas Athenae were guests at the dance. 

A blend of soft lights, lovely gowns, and low melodies gave fitting expression to a very successful mid-winter ball. 

COMMITTEE CHAIRMAN 

Marlys Richert General Chairman 

Dorothy Strese Decorations 

Marion Rheil Entertainment 

Louise Owen Invitations 

Mary Swiston Refreshments 

Versa Damv ....... Finance 

CHAPERONES 

Miss Lillian Jeter Mr. and Mrs. John Carter 

Miss Luella Wright Mrs. W. B. Davison 

Miss Mildred Lawton Mr. and Mrs. Paul Wilson 

GUESTS 

President and Mrs. B. E. Nelson Dean Ruth E. Michaels 

Dean and Mrs. C. A. Bowman Dean and Mrs. M. M. Price 

Director and Mrs. J. E. Grinnell 





VtRNA DaMM 



Marly* RicwrRT 



Dork Jepkry 






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O20> 



THE TOWER 1934 



JUNIOR PROM 

On May fifth. Charles Peterson and his guest. Dons Bradley, led more than a hundred and fifty couples in the 

grand march and dancing at the annual Junior Prom. Al Sky and his orchestra, and decorations in tones of blue,— a 
harmony of music and color, provided a background for the most brilliant party of the social season. 

COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN 

Robert Sherman Decoration 

Charles Peterson Reception 

Doris Jeffery Entertainynent 

MarySwiston Re/r«hmerjt5 

RuebenCarp /mirations 

Harland Wood worth - Publicit\ 

William Pearson Finance 

CHAPERONES 
Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Kranzuch Mks Van Ness 

GUESTS 

Prbsi :> Mrs. B. E. Nelson Dean Run aels 

Dean and Mrs. C. A. Bowman Dirktoi Irs. J. E. Grinnell 

Dean and Mrs. M. M. Price 




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i 121 y 



WINTER 



J . Industrial Arts Building. 



2. Paradise Valley where nature has done 
her wor\. 



3. A rooming house m toivn. 



4. Looking south from the Industrial Arts 
Building. 



5. Perched m the cave at Paradise Valley. 



6. Winding river that leads to the falls m 
Paradise Valley. 



7. A Menomonie home beautifully arbored 
by snowladen trees. 




® 



8. Yes, you can climb still higher m the 
valley. 



9. Down Red Cedar river in winter. 



10. Railroad traces along the Red Cedar 

river. 



II. Roof view of the Trades Building looting 
south. 



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BITS IN TOWN 



I. Home Economics Budding. 



2. Sumyner camp on the bani{ of the Red 
Cedar River. 



3. Mabel Tamter Memorial Library. 



4. Lynwood Hall, the living quarters of men 
students. 



5. Our S.S.A. President, "Bucl{," at wor\. 



6. Along the banl^s of beautiful La\e 
\ienoynm. 



7. Hockfil, President of the Senior Class. 



8. A tower for strength and time. 



9. Charting the Homecoynmg game. 



10. Does Jane thinly its cold? 



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HOME - 



1. Keep the Homecoming fires burning. 



2. The Homecoming bonfire shortly after 
the huge pile of crates and old lumber 
had been ignited. 



3. President >{elson leads the parade. 



4. Here comes the band! — and up goes a 
cheer as the head of the parade passes up 
Mam Street. 



5. Hyperians wheelchair invalid. 



6. F. O. B. welcomes you. 



7. S. T. S. street cleaners. They missed 
some dirt. 



8. Hyslop and Hanson have not passed out 
of the machine age. 



9. Metallurgy Club buries Superior. 



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COMING 

1 . Hopes high for victory. 

2. S. M. A. baby buggy. 

3. Rifle Club sharp-shooters. 

4. Prexy patronizes the hamburger sale. 

5. Philomatheans going to town with a nag. 

6. Manual Arts Players' queen of the day. 

8. Trams take to the highways at Home- 
coming time. 

9. 7. W. C. A. race horse. 
10. Hockey on the turf. 



I 




HERE AND THERE 



I. There are Philo smiles that mal{c us 
happy. 



2. A boy's ideas m interior decorating. 



3. Duda and these loxwdown tunes. 



4. We Three Kings of the Orient are. 



5. Heading for the Last Round Up. 



6. Racoons m the winter, Ted. 



7. Olson and Rohde went to Tac\y Drag. 



8. Singer in a South Side pose. 



9. What? ?—Ho broken leg. 



10. Try to part them. 






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THIS AND THAT 



1. Watch out for your hearts, boys. Ta\e 
my advice. 



2. One bright Sunday morn we all went 
to church. 



3. James Johnston \n a backward dive. 



4. Just before dinner at the Annex. 



5. Whispering waters of the Red Cedar 
River. 



6. Row! Row! for the shore, boys! Tm 
pulling for you. 



7. Walner slipping over La\e Menomin 
at top speed. 



8. Elizabeth and Sylvia m the shade of the 
Annex. 



9. "Bucl(' has a line we all are wise to. 



10. Hold still just one second, please. 



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LOOK AND SEE 



I, Three of a l{ind living at the Pierson 
House. 



2. Here we have the "Iron Range" sup- 
porters. 

3. Caught m the act of pretending. 



4. Boys, this is no fish story. Seeing is 
believing; so Jensen says. 



5. Whose turn to cool{ today? 



6. The bridge has held many a beauty fn 
its day. 



7. Eau Galle's strong man, Hanl{. 

8. Savannah Sacl{ might find this pull hard. 

9. The co-eds from Stoughton. 

10. OH! Hurry up, I cant wait much 
longer . . . ? 

11. Eunice out for a stroll alone? 



12. If it comes even to this, I'll worl{ for 
i a living. 




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NOW AND THEN 

J . Time.' time! to go to bed, boys. 

2. West Virginia's happy Carp. 

3. Rat/roading into school. Sparry. 

4. Breakfast? >(o, W. A. A. gathering. 

5. What is so rare as a day in June? 

6. Letter from home? Oh! no! 

7. F. O. B. all dressed up, and no place to go. 

8. Caught waiting for someone. 

9. Lets see now. Is it Math or letter to 



someone . . . : 



10. W. A. A. early morning hirers. 



11. All m one room at Lynwood. What a 
gang there is*. 



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you AND I 

1. Home Management for six weeks at a 
time, girls. 

2. Jack on the run for the ball. 

3. Tacf{y &*& attenders. 



4. They say sometimes you can find workers 
at the Annex. 



5. I've got you m the palm of my hands — 



6. Speed at his best doing the work of the 
F. O. B. 



7. Who will save me if I fall in? 



8. What a black eye the Tacky ^l g<*« u5 - 



9. Gahff masticators. 



10. Stella would go hiking. 



1 1 . Sing a little low-down tune. 



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GENERAL 
INFORMATION 

1. Royal Chariot — "the dinl^y." 

2. All right. Let's have the old skyrocket 



now 



3. We are good coof{$, so they tell us. 

4. Annex residents out for sunshine before 
lunch. 

5. Signs made to fit the occasion. 

6. .\ever one without the others. 



7. L. Wolske tried to win the beard-growing 
contest. 



8. Luncheons on Wednesday and Friday. 



9. It seems to me that this is an evergreen 
Earl. 



10. In the days of Frosh time. 



1 1 . Even May West visited our Tacky Drag 
\:ce going. Dave. 



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THE TOWER 1934 



PROLOGUE TO SISSLE'S FATE 
In Apprelle with his shoures sote, 
Sissle didth get out his boate, 
And furlith out his pretty sail; 
To catch the howling springe-time gale. 
The winde shot forth his timid crafte; 
Sissle boye no longer laugh t: 
The winde tipped Sissle into lake; 
The water creeped 'round Sissle's necke. 
And bathed every vein in deep liquor. 

— L.W. 

* 

DISCORDANT DISCOURSES 

The other night I turned my radio 
in on Station Stout. 

There must have been some error in 
who was to lecture that night because 
I could hear four different faculty 
members all trying to deliver their 
lectures, each trying to get in as many 
sentences as he could. I believe that 
Dr. Shafer was trying to lecture on the 
life of Napoleon; Burbidge on Exercise; 
Kieth on Using the Blowtorch, and 
Miss Buchanan on Baking a Cake. 

It sounded something like this: 

Tonight I am going to give you a 
lecture on how to operate a blow-torch. 
Take the blow-torch in your right hand: 

prime it in this manner Stand on 

your tip toes. Take a deep breath and 

Break three eggs on Napoleon 

who was in Paris trying to over- 
throw three tablespoons of butter 

and a cup of clear skin which can 

be gotten by adjusting the blow- 
torch with the left end of Na- 
poleon's troops which marched slowly 

into Half-Nelson. This hold can 

be broken by adding the remainder 

of the sour milk to Napoleon's 

wife, who plans to adjust your 

goggles by throwing your oppo- 
nent in a well buttered pan. 

Perhaps, if Napoleon had remembered 
-use fresh eggs: some that are 

not any older than three, or four 

thousand years before Napoleon gained 
.olding your opponent's 

toe while you add a half cup of 

chopped nut meats to -the solder- 
ing flux. - -If the present attitude 

of the French people shows that 

the best method of hardening the 
muscles is by letting the icing 

harden until it will cut cold rolled 
steel. Now remember whenever you 
use a blow-torch to use Grand- 
mother's Cocoa, and you will 
never see another man like Napoleon. 




"I refuse to be filibustered.'" 

Prof: What is the meaning of this 
poem? 

Frosh: It's too late, Professor. 

Prof: What do you mean, too late? 

Frosh: Well, Shelley is dead, and no 
one else knows. 




Welch's Wisdom. 

1. Dorit wear a bunch of eversharp 
pencils m your breast pocket. It 
ynal{cs you loof{ like a pipe-organ. 

2. An arc-welder will burn a blister 
on a board. 

In teaching Sheet-Metal, when your 
wire reel lool{s JiJje tt*>o porcupines, 
it's rime to trim it up. 



3. 



COUNCILS OF STATE 

There have been many editorials 
written about students loafing about 
the radiator in the H. E. building. 
Those who write the editorials say 



that the time the students spend at 
that place is wasted. A better under- 
standing of what occurs there would 
prove the fallacy of such an assumption. 
To eradicate any critical attitude of the 
faculty toward those who make the 
radiator their stamping grounds the 
following conversation was recorded. 
This record will prove without a doubt 
that the conversations are of a very 
high calibre: 

Mr. H: Hello, fellow students. 

Mr. Q: Hi, Roommate. 

Mr. P: Howdy, you big pallooka. 

Miss X: Oh, hello, Herman. 

Mr. H: "When do we have that quiz 
in Administration?" 

Mr. Q: "Wednesday." 

Mr. P: "I'm telling you, I'll be lucky 
if I flunk in that quiz." 

Miss X: "Tomorrow is Wednesday, 
isn't it?" 

Mr. H. "Yes, and the horror of it all. 
I wish that Wednesday would 
come after Thursday instead 
of before it." 

Mr. Q: "That would be great. If 
Thursday came before Wed- 
nesday we couldn't have hash 
at our house from Wednesday 
left-overs." 

Mr. P: "I think that since the time is 
limited we ought to deviate 
from the academic, and dwell 
more upon less technical mat- 
ters." 

Mr. H: "Yeah. Let's talk about the 
bird-house I am building." 

Miss X: "Are you building a bird- 
house? Bird-houses fascinate 
me." 

Mr. H: "Yes. I am putting two doors 
on it." 

Mr. Q: "Why two doors?" 

Mr. H: "Well, the front door is for 
family use, and the back door 
is for agents to rap on." 

Mr. P: "Sounds nuts to me." 

Miss X: "Don't look now. but isn't 
Professor Zilch standing in 
the doorway staring at us 
disapprovingly?" 

Mr. Q: "I suppose that he thinks 
we're wasting our time. Well. 
I'll be seeing you." 

MissX: "So long." 

Mr. H: (Quite loudly) "I hope that 
we can meet again here soon 
to delve deeper into the impli- 
cations of the N.R.A." 



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4132> 



THE TOWER 1934 




WHO'S WHO 



"Tes, but you should see my onions." 

APPLIED PHYSICS 

February 3rd: 

The populace of Menomonie were 
surprised to hear over the air that 
"Tusty" had won the weekly ton of P. 
and A. Briquets. Subsequent investi- 
gation disclosed the winning statement 
to be: Using the formula: 

L (y-z) I 

X = H Ex — 

P R 

I find that there are more B.T.U.'s., 
Watts, Foot-pounds, Calories, Ergs, 
Joules, etc., than in any other coal 
which I have ever shoveled. 

Tusty. 
P. S. — The ash content of P. and A. 
Briquets is also higher than one usually 
encounters. 
March 2: 
"Tusty" buys a ton of Stott Briquets. 

SB 

ADVICE TAKEN 
Bernie: "How did you persuade your 

old man to send you to college for 

another year?" 

Borden: "I told him if he didn't 

I'd get married, and I guess he thought 

he couldn't afford that." 



Miss Hassler .it M.A.P. meeting: 
"And to that individual best suited to 
the part — Ted Pierson — I now give 
the part of 'ardent lover' ". 




Howard Sanding. 

Reason for fame: His ability, as an 
exponent of the Stoopnagle and Bud 
school of slangists, to evade all ques- 
tions by saying, "What's that, ?iewt?" 
And because of his ability to drag 
into any conversation that in famous 
platitude, "Great Day." 





Harold "Cunney" Sacl{. 

Reason for fame: The manly way in 
which this sentimental gentleman 
from Georgia lost his Southern drawl 
so that he would not offer the fresh' 
man boys too much competition. 




'Banjo" Larson. 
Reason for fame: A new girl friend 
every month. When asl{ed about 
this magnetic power he cleared his 
throat, breathed deeply, and promptly 
replied with the question, "Can I 
help u if I've both youth and beauty?" 



S^r 



"A beautiful specimen, is it not?" 

TRENDS IN AMERICAN 
LANGUAGE 

The present trend in the American 
language is to abbreviate everything 
that can be abbreviated. At first, 
while we were not on our guard, they 
slipped in the N.R.A. On its heel 
came the C.C.C., and the P.W.A. 
If this continues, it will not be long 
before it will be treason to write or 
say any words that contain more than 
four letters. Perhaps tomorrow we 
will be talking like this: 

"I GSS I WLL HAV TO GV YU 
ANTHR CT, STEVS."— HNSN. 

"CHK."— TSTISN. 

"DNT YU SE."— MTZ. 

"THS IS THE BST LITL TL THT 
MNY CN BY."— MLNES. 

" WHN I WS BLDNG A BRD FNCE 
ARND THE CMP."— BOWMN. 

"GT IN THR ND FIGT YU 
MUGS."— BRBGD. 

This is what we can expect in the 
future. Be prepared. 



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THE TOWER 1934 



MENOMONIE 
Gray white. 
And smudgy black. 
Cold muddy water. 
Oily snowflakes of soot. 
March in Menomonie. 
Gaunt trees. 
And muddy porches. 
Streaky fogged windows. 
Low winter worn woodpiles. 
Spring in Menomonie. 
Sooty roofs. 
And grimy chimneys. 
Green tipped branches. 
Cloud barred skies opening. 
Summer comes in Menomonie. 
-R.J. 





fc\ 



Miss Mutz. 

Her talents — art appreciation, color 
consciousness, knowledge of design — 
ideas of harmony— Would that we all 
could be artistic! "Don't you see?" 
"I believe it will come through all 
right'" 

HER FATE 
She got an F in cooking. 
In sewing she was poor. 
But, that was last semester. 
Annie doesn't live here any more. 

SECRET WISH 
The guy I'd like to drop into 
The deepest of the deep. 
Is he who snores in each dry class. 
And keeps me from my sleep. 

Ray: "Why, Professor, that is an ex' 
cellent freehand sketch of a modern- 
istic dog-house that you have drawn 
on the board." 

Professor: "Is that what it is? I 
meant it to be a rent graph." 



-:'•*** 



Professor: I said "Hecl{" not "Chec\!' 




Before long-bearded Beauchamp was 
given the prize for the most unique 
hirsuit growth at this year's Tacfy 
Drag he underwent a unique cross- 
questioning. As this aspirant to the 
House of David stepped up to the 
platform the following was recorded: 
Presenter of the Prize for the Most 
Unique Bears: Just what do you 
eat to grow such a fascinattng beard? 
B. Beauchamp: Wheaties! P. O. T. 
P. F. T. M. V. B.: What would 
your dad say if he saw you now? 
B. B.: He would say, "Great Day!" 
P. : What do you smoke 7 B. B.: 

Bull Durham. It never gets on 
my nerves. 

Now that Ted Pierson plays at a 
saxophone his dreams of living in a 
glass house will never come true. 



IRRADIATIONS 
From my pipe 

Smoke wreathes and twists as if 
In pain from the 
Hot embers of the leaves of 

Elysian pleasure. 
Bleak and glaiii 

The light in the table lamp burnson. 
Above my blotter pad. 
Torn and spotted with time's 

ravishir. 
Thoughts come creeping, — 
Thoughts, writhing and twisting 

as if 
In pain 
From the whirling pandemonium 

of feverish brain. 
Bleak and glaring 
The calendar on the table glares 

back at me. 
Letters and figures 
Warningof the Organization exam. 

R. J. 




Miss McCalmont 

Dignity and warmth — contagious 
smiles and meaningful frowns — Her 
rushing, racing, \ey swinging "get- 
away" down the corridor — her "heart 
to heart" chats, her chemistry picnics, 
and hillside weiner -roasts. Oh, to 
understand such a personality! — 

CHEM. LAB. 
Clean shelves and deep drawers 
And death in every bottle. 
Death gleaming and shining from every 

flask and jar 
Blue, copper, the exquisite green. 
All death, swift and merciless. 

Marvels and miracles working in the 

mortar 
And in the test-tubes — colors and 

compounds 
Changing to readier death, swifter 

working; 
Outside the snow is simple and clean. 
Blue and white silk, rustling in the wind. 



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OtfB 



THE TOWER 1934 



PSYCHOLOGY OF 
EXAMINATIONS 
Students often wonder how examina- 
tion questions are chosen. Sometimes 
the questions are easy to answer; 
sometimes they are difficult. Research 
has shown that the professor's mood 
at the time of selection has much to do 
with the type he will ask. If on the 
morning of the examination he rinds 
that all of his socks need darning, 
that his son has contracted the me 
the cat has spilled the milk, and that 
his wife h.is asked for a new hat, the 
questions will be of this type 

1. What was Nero's mother-in-law's 
lie name? 

2. *«How high is up? Why? 

3. Enumerate sixty causes of the 
Punic wars. 

4. Discuss bnetly the school situa- 
tion in Mongolia. 

It. however, on the morning of the 
examination the professor's wife pre- 
pares a delicious breakfast for him, 
his son tells him that he "cleaned up" 
on a boy who said his dad is an old 
fossil, and the cat stays away from the 
milk, the questions will be more of 
this nature: 

1. When was the war of 1812? 

2. An American named Charles 
Augustus is known as Lindy. 

The World War was fought in : 
1. Asia. 2. Dunn County. 3. Europe. 
4. Rusk. 

BLIND TO CHARTS? 

Dr. Blom: "Weak eyes, eh? Well, 
son. how many lines can you read on 
that chart?" 

Bill Baxter: "What chart?" 

*. 

K ARRIVES ON TIME 

Her face was flushed. The breath 
came from between her moist parted 
lips in short tremulous gasps. Her lips 
and nostrils quivered; her whole body 
trembled with emotion. She surrendered 
herself to the strong out-stretched arms. 
How strong and protecting the broad 
back. How sturdy the legs which 
supported it. Breathing softly, she 
closed her eyelids, her mind soaring 
into the great realm of the sublime. 
How restful was this chair after the 
long hard run for her eight o'clock 

APPRECIATION 

Loud sighs cr.ine from a rear seat in 

the local Oipheum. The entire audience 

glared Kick at Miss Williams, enjoying 

her fifth viewing of "Little Women." 




Hope Springs Eternal 




'I ha\-e a pne jor you, — by the way, — 
u> here's the reserve bool{ you drew 
for the last hour 7 " 



FAMOUS WORDS: 

Miss Van Ness: "is it not?" or 
"Don't you kno-oo-w?" 

Miss Buchanan: "Scrape the bowl 
clean." 

Miss Jeter: "Oh, say girls— You'll 
have to excuse me — I have an appoint- 
merr 

Miss Walsh: "Absolutely'" 

Miss Michaels: "Did you mis- 
notice on the bulletin board?" 

Jane Green (rushing by and calling 
over her shoulder): "I'll be back in a 
minute." 

Marlys Richert: "Have you heard 
the latest?" 

Virginia Gunz: (Deep sigh)— "Oh— 
dear— What'll I do r ' 

Helen Diednch: "I suppose I'll have 
to." 

Doris Jeffery: "Whatcha dome 

Marge Leonard: "Oh— O?" 

Dorothy Darling: "You betcha." 

Carmen Sprieter: "Kid, I'm just 
swamped." 

Grace Johnston: "Where's Ernie?" 

Brenner: "I could fall for a girl 
like her." 

Burgetf "May I sing for you?" 

Sack: "My southern dialect seems to 
have an undescribable effect upon the 
co-ec 

D. Ston: "Hylland, you great big 
basketball hero, you." 

Sherman: "I still maintain that Virg 
did not have anything to do with my 
not letting my beard grow for the 
Tacky Drag." 

Hislop: "The advantage of being 
tall is that I can talk over most people's 
heads, and that they have to look 
up to me." 

M. Wolske: "Oh, well, we all can't 
be runts." 

Ed. Brimer: "I prefer the dances at 
Knapp." 

C. Hylland: "She certainly is a 
Honey." 

Sue Nelson: "If gentlemen prefer 
blondes. I must be no gentleman." 



DOC BLUSHES AGAIN 

Dr. Shafer: "In the old days every- 
thing sold rapidly Think of horses 

and buggies, for example. To.: 
factory can't sell horses, no matter 
how rapidly it makes them." (Followed 
by intense blushing by Dr. Shafer). 



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Q^HIS YEARBOOK wu 
C3 designed and photo* 
composed throughout bv the 
adaption of new principles to 
one of the oldest methods of 
printing 

By the 

Bucxbee'Mears Company 

St. Paul, Minn. 

Lithographing, Composition, 

Printing and Binding 

by the 

H. M. Smyth Printing Co. 

St. Paul, Minn. 

Covert by 
David J. Moiaoy Company I 

Chicago, 111. 






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